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The Hollis Strawberry Festival will use 370 quarts of berries. Courtesy photo.




71st annual Hollis Strawberry Festival

Where: Hollis Town Common, 7 Monument Square, Hollis; rain site is Hollis Brookline Middle School, 25 Main St., Hollis 
When: Sunday, June 25, from 2 to 4 p.m. 
Cost: Free admission; strawberry treats priced individually 
Visit: holliswomansclub.org





Berry delicious
Strawberry festival returns to Hollis

06/22/17



 Fifty quarts of whipping cream, 39 gallons of ice cream and 370 quarts of strawberries will be used at this year’s Hollis Strawberry Festival, happening at the Town Commons on Sunday, June 25. 

The festival is hosted by the Hollis Woman’s Club and the Hollis Town Band. It started 71 years ago as a day of relaxation, when Hollis farmers could socialize with one another and enjoy the fruits of their labor. Now, it’s a chance for the whole town to come together, pay tribute to Hollis farms past and show support for the farms still running.
“It’s always been a celebration of Hollis’ agricultural history,” festival co-chair Lori Dwyer said. “Everywhere you go in Hollis in the summertime, there is something growing, whether it’s corn, tomatoes and other vegetables, raspberries, apples or, of course, strawberries. It’s just neat and a privilege to live in a town that still has these working farms.” 
Upon arrival, attendees will receive an order form on which they can fill out what kind of treat they want: traditional strawberry shortcake with or without whipped cream and with or without vanilla ice cream, a strawberry sundae, just a bowl of strawberries with or without sugar, or just an ice cream in a cup or a cone. 
“The shortcakes are … made from flour, heavy cream and sugar, so it’s a very moist and rich-tasting shortcake,” Dwyer said. 
Once people fill out their forms, they’ll pay the cashier and take the forms up to the “shortcake factory” where volunteers will be assembling the treats. 
David Orde, owner of Lull Farm, which supplies the berries along with Brookdale Fruit Farm, said there will be no lack of strawberries for the festival this year. 
 “It’s the perfect year for strawberries. We have a beautiful crop this year, extremely bountiful,” he said. “We started picking about a week ago, and the bulk is still to come. Depending on the weather, we’ll probably go through mid-July.”
Dwyer said she’s expecting as many as 1,000 attendees this year. 
“It’s a very basic and simple festival, but it’s a long-running tradition. A lot of people come out to it,” she said. “It’s just a good day for everyone.” 
Planning and publicity for the festival began in January. The week of the festival, the strawberries are picked at Brookdale and Lull farms and brought to Hardy Hall for a “hulling party,” where volunteers will spend the day cleaning, hulling, slicing and sugaring them. 
Once the strawberries are prepared, they’re taken back to Brookdale Fruit Farm, where they’re refrigerated until the day of the festival. Meanwhile, bakers are making the shortcakes, and the vanilla ice cream is ordered from Doc Davis Ice Cream. 
“It’s very involved, but somehow, it all comes together,” Dwyer said. 
Additionally, there will be live music performed by the Hollis Town Band, a raffle, 10 local vendors selling homemade items, and face painting and games for kids.  
Proceeds from the festival will benefit the scholarships and charities supported by the Hollis Woman’s Club. 





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