The Hippo

HOME| ADVERTISING| CONTACT US|

 
Oct 1, 2016







NEWS & FEATURES

POLITICAL

FOOD & DRINK

ARTS

MUSIC & NIGHTLIFE

POP CULTURE



BEST OF
CLASSIFIEDS
ADVERTISING
CONTACT US
PAST ISSUES
ABOUT US
MOBILE UPDATES
LIST MY CALENDAR ITEM






Of Montreal, Innocence Reaches (Polyvinyl Records)

After doing this for going on 15 years now, I can usually just brush off a particularly bad record the way a windshield handles a moth, but this Athens, Georgia, paisley-glam band’s last record Aureate Gloom was so thoroughly, needlessly annoying I had to get a script from a shrink. Its phoned-in, uninspired jangle-joke anti-melodies just don’t compare to similar product like Electric Six or, to go the distance with the comparison, funky Zappa — I mean, I just wanted to grab one of these morons and throw him in a vat of pizza sauce and snapping turtles. The only — only — thing decent about it was a moment of Buzzcocks theft, but other than that it was the sort of crook-leg dingbattery that makes it onto an Apple commercial that gets yanked after a week of exposure. Maybe they heard my psychic pleas for them to stop, because this new set here has them going back to what they do worst: EDM techno. Lazy robo-voiced nu-rave electro-skronk characterizes opener “Let’s Relate,” followed by the 9,000th song to be titled “It’s Different for Girls,” featuring forcedly apathetic, amateurish drone-drawling from singer Kevin Barnes. Oy vey, what a waste. (Pitchfork likes you, Kevin! They really, really like you!) FEric W. Saeger





Dead Gaze, Easy Travels (Ernest Jenning Record Co.)
CD Reviews: September 29, 2016

09/29/16



Dead Gaze, Easy Travels (Ernest Jenning Record Co.)

If you like Nirvana but wished they’d been more Queens of the Stone Age-ish, this Oxford, Mississippi, band’s Brain Holiday album of three years ago would have made you one happy fool. Since that chalky, blocky album’s release, bandleader Cole Furlow has gotten married and blah blah blah, which is what hipster-leaning band guys do these days, exactly the opposite of how things went in the old days. It’s nice that lots of bands can nowadays negotiate the sort of halfway decent record contract that can bankroll a semi-respectable lifestyle (at the very least, you have to be happy they’re not competing for your job), but it does also automatically foment risk-aversion and unoriginality. In this case, though, with a fairly obsessed songwriter in play, all bets are off. There’s nothing predictable about album opener “Constantly Happy” or its psychedelic-grunge riff receiving support from clean breakbeats underneath, while “Wait for Nothing” is like a crazy-muddy Melvins cover of a Kurt Cobain hit. Sure, that’s still slightly familiar, but the screwy tropical-polyrythyms of “Jump” aren’t. Lots of good stuff here. A  





®2016 Hippo Press. site by wedu