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Oct 1, 2014







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Your business and education
Granite Views Fred Bramante

09/25/14



Recently, I have been giving tours of the rock ’n’ roll museum at Thrifty’s Secondhand Stuff, on Candia Road in Manchester, to groups of students. As they view an Elvis Cadillac, the organ from Boston Garden and other memorabilia, I talk to them about the history of rock ’n’ roll.

The group I spoke to most recently was from Manchester’s MC2, Making Community Connections Charter School. The school was founded by Kim Carter, former New Hampshire Teacher of the Year, and is based on giving students learning opportunities outside the traditional classroom environment by connecting students with the community.
As expected, the students loved the museum tour. MC2 school leader Eddie Marseau got back to me after the tour and said that half of the students want to do internships at Thrifty’s. I was thrilled.
So, what would Thrifty’s do to ensure high-quality educational experiences? Here are some of the thoughts that Eddie and I put together. In Music Appreciation and Creative Writing, “Young Kids Reviewing Old Music,” students will be trained by MC2 staff on various writing styles of music critics. Then they’ll pick out albums (vinyl/CDs) of historical significance and write a review of them. When these reviews have been deemed to be of high quality by MC2 staff, we will seek to get them published (maybe even in the Hippo).
Other learning experiences may include the history and social impact of rock ’n’ roll, business math, marketing, merchandising and, one that I particularly like, public speaking, by training students to become docents in the rock ’n’ roll museum where they’ll be giving tours to Thrifty’s customers.
Thrifty’s will work with MC2 educators to ensure that the learning experiences will be deemed worthy of school credit.
The big lesson here is that, in most businesses, there are multiple learning opportunities in a variety of curriculum areas that can provide valuable experiences for students.
The Manchester School District is looking for 1,000 community partners (i.e. businesses, nonprofits, talented individuals) to provide valuable, real-world learning experiences for credit toward graduation for its students and would love to get you involved. What kinds of learning experiences could students get from you? Interested? Let me know. 
For information on how to become a mentor contact Fred Bramante at fbramante@nccbl.org.





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