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Southern-style Pig Roast

 
When: Saturday, Aug. 30, from noon to 2:30 p.m.
 
Where: On the grounds of the Tuck Museum, 40 Park Ave., Hampton
 
Cost: $20; students ages 9-16 $10; children under 8 get in free 
 




Pig out
A southern-style roasting in Hampton

08/28/14
By Allie Ginwala aginwala@hippopress.com



A northern community will put on a Southern feast this Labor Day weekend. The 13th annual southern-style pig roast on the grounds of the Tuck Museum in Hampton will welcome hundreds of guests to the summer cookout on Saturday, Aug. 30.
 
Betty Moore, executive director of the event’s host, the Hampton Historical Society, said the idea for a pig roast came about when a historical society member offered himself as “pig master” if the organization ever decided to do a roast. One of the society’s co-chairs, a southern U.S. native, thought a Southern-style pig roast, a rarity in the area, would make a fun tradition.
 
Today, over 60 people volunteer to help cook, serve, set up and take down for the pig roast, Betty said. 
 
Ben Moore, Betty’s husband and fellow historical society board member, is one volunteer. He said that about two weeks before the big day, the pit is constructed on the Tuck Museum grounds. Made of concrete blocks, it’s about 7 feet wide and 12 feet long. 
 
The night before the roast, three pigs weighing about 130 pounds each are picked up from Blood Farm in Groton, Mass., already butchered and dressed. The cooks do a little prep and then put the pigs on the fryer. 
 
“They go on … around 11 p.m. and cook overnight,” Ben Moore said.
 
Two or three volunteers sleep with the piggies to monitor the roasting all night.
 
Historical society members and volunteers make desserts and provide drinks as well. A number of local restaurants, such as The Old Salt, The Galley Hatch and 401 Tavern, donate coleslaw, potato salad, pasta salad, baked beans, applesauce and rolls to the event. Other local businesses donate gift certificates
to help the volunteer staff cover the needed “odds and ends,” Betty Moore said.
 
Guests can also enjoy activities and games in the afternoon. Outdoor games like croquet and bean bag toss will be set up, and there will be live performances from country and swing musicians, “a little bit of everything” that keeps with the outdoorsy atmosphere, Betty Moore said. 
 
The 50/50 raffle will be back, a popular feature that brought $500 to last year’s winner. Finally, there will be a silent auction. In the past they’ve received donations from local businesses in the form of a granite mailbox post, a week-long vacation in Hawaii, pieces of art, decorated cakes, and autographed baseballs courtesy of the Boston Red Sox. 
 
“It can be almost everything and anything,” Ben Moore said. “A little bit of something for everyone.”
 
The pig roast has become a beloved event in the area in large part due to its community ties. 
 
“When you live in a town like Hampton, you look for things to draw a community together. This certainly is one of those events we all look forward to,” Betty Moore said. 
 
The roast is the biggest fundraising event of the year for the Hampton Historical Society.  
 
 





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