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Nov 16, 2018







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Winter Harvest from 110 Grill. Courtesy photo.




Two to try

From the bar at 110 Grill
 
Winter Harvest
2 ounces Tito’s Vodka
1.5 ounces apple/ginger shrub*
.5 ounce lemon juice
Cinnamon/sugar, for rim of martini glass
*House-made shrub incorporates fresh ginger, apples, allspice, berries, cloves, star anise, cinnamon and apple cider
 
Combine all ingredients over ice in a shaker. Shake well for 10 seconds until chilled. Dip a martini glass into the cinnamon/sugar mixture.  Strain the cocktail into the glass. Garnish with a ginger candy.
 
New Cuban
.5 ounce Sailor Jerry rum
.25 ounce fresh lime juice
.5 ounce simple syrup
2 dashes Angostura bitters
Prosecco
1 mint leaf, smacked
 
Pour Sailor Jerry rum, fresh lime juice, simple syrup, and bitters into a Champagne flute.  Fill glass with prosecco. Garnish with a smacked mint leaf. 




5 tips for seasonal sips
Year of Awesome 2016

01/07/16
By Allie Ginwala aginwala@hippopress.com



Get in the spirit 

In the spirits world, this time of year is typically ruled by bourbon, whiskey and scotch, but Julia Dale, 110 Grill mixologist, said the key to making winter cocktails is finding something that warms your soul. “You can basically use anything, it just depends on what you mix it with,” she said.
 
Mix it up
Mixers — juice, soda, fruit and spices — help give a cocktail its flair and Dale said the latest trend in the cocktail world is shrubs. “You cook down … different spices and different fruits into apple cider vinegar and let it sit for 24 hours and strain it and that’s your mixer,” she said. The appeal is that you can get much more flavor into one mixer with a shrub instead of using a handful of juices, plus you can get more creative.
 
Find your flavor
Whether it’s a cosmo or hot cider, fill your cocktail with flavors that match the season, like cinnamon, ginger and cranberry. You can even make your own simple syrups, Dale said. “You can basically put anything with sugar and water so that’s really easy to do at home,” she said, like melting down peppermint candy for an at-home peppermint syrup.
 
Think outside the box
Aspiring home mixologists should experiment with flavor and presentation.  For example, 110 Grill served a mulled winter sangria that didn’t go over well — until they served it cold. Now they warm it over the stove with the mulling spices, chill with red wine and serve over ice. Take something you typically enjoy and turn it on its head, like sparkling wine in a cocktail. “If you have a bottle of Champagne and a couple liquors you can mix something up [that’s] lying around the house,” she said, or pop in the fridge for some fresh ingredients.
 
Know your limits
Dale recommends saving the recipes that call for complex or unique liquors for when you go out. “I would say leave that to the restaurants and make the more simple cocktails with more well-known liquors at home,” she said.





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