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Jan 22, 2018







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Do’s and don’t on the floor

Do: Pay attention to others on the floor. Avoiding collisions is a good thing.
Don’t: Be on display. This is the bride and groom’s day.
Do: Make song requests from the DJ to put your moves to use.
Don’t: Request a “cha cha.” Ask instead for a specific song you know you can cha cha to.
 
Dancer’s Toolbox
• Foot placement and steps are important, but being able to work and move with a partner is essential. 
• Learn a basic box step. It’s manageable and versatile and can be applied to a number of music styles. 
• Know the fifth position break or rock step. This swing basic step can be assembled into a figure or set of steps. 
• Have a triple step rhythm. Built upon with fifth position break, it can be used in east coast swing, west coast swing and cha cha.




A blueprint of moves
How to dance at a wedding

04/02/15
By Allie Ginwala aginwala@hippopress.com



Sure, you can bounce around your living room to the latest Taylor Swift song or groove along to hits from the ’80s in your car, but how do you fare on the dance floor?  

“Most people when they go into a wedding situation or a party situation, they hear the music, they like the music, they know they want to move to the music, but they don’t yet have the … blueprint for how to make that work with a partner,” said Karen Shackleford, owner of Queen City Ballroom and Cape Sands Ballroom. 
Weddings typically have an array of music, so having a blueprint or core group of basic steps to apply to multiple songs may come in handy. 
“That’s part of what people will need to do when they learn dancing is to be able to take what they learn and adapt it,” she said. “We want them to use it in a creative way and we want them to think outside of the box.” 
Have a “dancer’s toolbox” ready with a few basic steps and principles that can be applied to the top three dance styles Shackleford heard in a list of 100 top songs: swing, cha cha and hustle.
While the steps are important, if your body is telling you to move a certain way to a song, go with that. 
“Listen to what your body is telling you about the music because you can’t go wrong,” Shackleford said. “Everyone else that’s out on the floor is doing their thing, and they’re not standing there watching you, they’re focusing on what they’re doing. Try not to take it too seriously because you’re there to have a good time.” 
 
As seen in the April 2, 2015 issue of the Hippo.





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