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Nov 17, 2018







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We Are One Festival. Courtesy photo.




We Are One Festival

Where: Veterans Memorial Park, 889 Elm St., Manchester
When: Saturday, Aug. 13, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Cost: Free admission
Visit: ujimacollective.mysite.com




A festival of flavors
We Are One Festival features multicultural cuisine

08/11/16
By Angie Sykeny asykeny@hippopress.com



 Visitors will have the chance to try authentic Latin American and African cuisine at the annual We Are One Festival happening Saturday, Aug. 13, at Veterans Memorial Park in Manchester.

“This is one of the few times of the year when people will have access to some of this type of food without having to travel to New York City or Boston or other metropolitan areas,” said Woullard Lett, a member of the festival planning committee.
The We Are One Festival is a collaborative effort between the Manchester-area Spanish-speaking community and communities of African descent to host a celebration of the cultures they represent through food, music and dance performances, crafts, vendors and exhibitors.
“Manchester has the highest concentration of Spanish-speaking citizens and citizens of African descent in the state,” Lett said. “[The festival] gives those communities cultural affirmation and an opportunity to connect to the larger community.”
There will be at least five food vendors at the festival, including one of the oldest Latino-owned businesses in Manchester, Don Quijote Restaurant, representing Mexican, Dominican and Caribbean cuisine; Dos A-A Restaurant from Nashua, a Colombian restaurant; Manchester-based food truck Made With Love 603 offering Puerto Rican cuisine; and food tables organized by the communities representing the African countries South Sudan and Togo.
While some Latin American cuisine is familiar to many people and available at a number of local restaurants, Lett said, the South Sudan and Togo food for sale will be a unique opportunity for people to try a new kind of cuisine that is rarely available locally.
Among the South Sudan food, people may find kisra, a fermented bread made from the sorghum grain, and dishes based on millet, a rice similar to quinoa, which often feature meats like goat, beef and chicken, cooked with stews with peanuts and spinach.
The food from Togo, Lett said, is “much more cosmopolitan.” Fufu, dough made from pounded yams, is a staple of the Togo and West African region cuisine. It’s served in a variety of dishes with vegetables, sauces, meats or fish. Because Togo has a coast on the Atlantic Ocean, fish is widely used, as well as native fruits like pineapple, kiwi and mango.
“The food is a big draw at the festival. I like to say, a lot of people come for the food and stay for the music,” Lett said. “The focus is really just food, family and fun, and celebrating the diversity of this community.”





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