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Apr 22, 2018







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Learn about cheese and wine at the Concord Food Co-op. Courtesy photo.




Cheesy Wine Down Wednesday

When: First Wednesday of the month from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Upcoming classes include Wednesday, July 2, and Wednesday, Aug. 6. 
Where: Concord Food Co-op (24 S. Main St., Concord) in the cafe seating area
Cost: $6, pre-registration required
Visit: concordfoodcoop.coop/cheese




A real gouda time
New discoveries at Cheesy Wine Down Wednesdays

06/26/14



 There’s something cheesy going on at the Concord Food Co-op. Once a month, Cheesy Wine Down Wednesdays are giving co-op members and the lactose-curious something to taste and talk about. 

Co-op cheese buyer Suzy Studebaker and former co-op cheese buyer Heidi Pope love cheese. For them, this program is all about sharing and discovering new tastes.
“I am a cheese lover, Suzy’s a cheese lover,” Pope said. “Neither of us went to school for cheese. But as a cheese buyer, you learn a lot.”
The classes are generally half regulars and half newcomers, and everyone comes for a different reason. Many are cheese lovers, and others love wine, so Cheesy Wine Down Wednesday gives them a chance to find new favorites. 
But others attend because they want to learn more about the food. It’s definitely educational, Pope said, but it’s not stuffy.
“Food is meant to be fun,” she said. “No one’s ever seemed to be unhappy, and it’s not just the wine.”
The format is simple; come, sample, taste and chat. Like an open (and tasty) classroom, Pope and Studebaker along with the wine vendors and guest cheesemakers answer questions, generate dialogue and talk about the cheeses and wines. Chances are, you’ll walk away having learned about how that wine or cheese was made, but also finding a new favorite to add to your plate.
Each guest receives a plate of different cheeses (and other pairings, like jam or fig spreads and crackers), wine (usually about four varietals) and something from the co-op bakery. 
Each class features a different cheesemaker or type of cheese. Pope said that they’ve had classes that featured Scandinavian cheeses and a class all about Parmesans.
The July class will feature summertime cheeses, like mozzarella and ricotta from Maplebrook Farm in Vermont. Studebaker will also prepare tastings of fleur verte (a goat cheese with herbs) and Bleu d’Auvergne (a French blue cheese). Pope said that the summer classes will feature lighter flavors and cheeses that pair well with summer salads.
Pope said that for the co-op, it’s helpful to hear what people like. 
At the June class, Grafton Village Cheese shared various cheeses, but only a few were currently in the co-op’s cheese case. 
“The co-op really is about quality and food and enjoyment,” Pope said. “There’s so much good food out there.” 
 
As seen in the June 26, 2014 issue of the Hippo.





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