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Carolyn and Rick Hunt share and illustrate a story. Courtesy photo.




Winter Celebration

When: Sat., Dec. 6 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Where: Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum, 18 Highlawn Road, Warner
Cost: $5 per person, family maximum $20
Contact: 456-3244, indianmuseum.org




A season for stories
Museum embraces winter tradition

11/27/14
By Allie Ginwala aginwala@hippopress.com



 To honor the native tradition of gathering together as the days get colder, the Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum is holding a Winter Celebration on Saturday, Dec. 6.

“Winter is the time you tell stories,” said Lynn Clark, museum executive director. “It’s a time of socializing and passing on … tradition through stories, and also having a good time.” 
In native tradition, winter represented a change in daily work. The harvest was done, the food stored, so with little to do outside as snow settled in, winter was the perfect time to catch up on crafting and visit with family and friends. 
“It’s an old, old tradition,” Clark said.
The museum’s Winter Celebration is a modern take on traditional themes associated with wintertime activities. Clark expects 20 to 50 people to come and take part in dancing, crafting, eating and, of course, storytelling.
“The storytellers we have coming are wonderful,” Clark said. 
Willow, for example, tells a mixture of traditional stories and original, more modern tales. The way she chooses which story to tell is with a bag of stones that each have a different drawing on them. 
“The audience picks which story she’ll tell — never the same twice,” Clark said.
Storytellers Carolyn and Rick Hunt share their anecdotes in a rather unique way. While Carolyn speaks to the audience, Rick continuously illustrates her words on a large canvas. 
“Out of this mass of squiggly lines this beautiful art emerges,” Clark said.
New this year is the featured craft, gourd bowl making, and a lecture on language titled “Language, Culture and the Woodlands Indians.” The discussion will cover Narragansett, Abenaki and other languages in the Northeast. 
Food served at the celebration will consist of traditional recipes and dishes made with plants grown in the museum’s garden, such as boiled cornbread with berries, Abenaki corn soup and sunflower seed cakes.
Clark hopes Winter Celebration and similar events will educate New Hampshire residents about the native populations in the state. 
“This is where they’ve always been and where they still are,” she said. “Events like these [show that] the [Native American] culture is vibrant. We’re very lucky that they choose to share it with us.”
 
As seen in the November 27, 2014 issue of the Hippo.





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