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Jan 19, 2018







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Learning to make pizza. Courtesy photo.




La Scuola Culinaria Cappellacci di Zucca

When: Monday, Jan. 18, at 6 p.m.
Where: Tuscan Market, 63 Main St., Salem
Tickets: $125
Visit: tuscanbrands.com/Market/Salem/cooking-school. 
Other upcoming classes include breadmaking on Monday, Jan. 25, and pizza on Monday, Feb. 8. Class prices vary.




A taste of Italy
New season of La Scuola Culinaria

01/14/16
By Allie Ginwala aginwala@hippopress.com



 Learn how to make butternut squash ravioli, Italian breads and margherita pizza — plus a smattering of Italian phrases to impress your friends with — during one of Tuscan Market’s cooking school classes that kick off on Monday, Jan. 18.

“We like to teach our guests a bit about artisan Italian food and why it’s so good,” education and cooking school developer Jennifer Tarbox said in a phone interview. 
She helps come up with the class subjects to offer to the public, trying to find the perfect balance of presenting beloved Italian cuisine, its history and perhaps some lesser-known dishes as well.
“People know about pizza, pasta and gelato, but they don't know about the history behind it,” she said.
Tuscan Market starts the new year of classes by showing guests how to make cappellacci di zucca, butternut squash ravioli. 
“It’s not something you find every day here in the U.S.,” she said. 
The class begins in typical fashion: Everyone puts on an apron and enjoys a crostini and prosecco tasting before the chefs leading the class introduce themselves and get folks started at their work stations. It’s a fully hands-on workshop, and participants will not only make and assemble the pasta and filling, but also enjoy a three-course meal featuring their creation after the class.
“It’s fun to watch them make cappellacci because everyone’s looks a little different,” Tarbox said. 
For the bread class on Jan. 25 the group will make cinnamon bread and semolina bread, and for the pizza class on Feb. 8 it’s all about the traditional margherita. There will be food to bring home after all three classes.
The subject for each of the winter classes stems from the goal of presenting homemade recipes perfect for the season and also debunking some of the preconceived notions surrounding artisanal Italian fare.
“Bread, everyone gets a little daunted [by it], so this is a nice intro course on how to make bread and it’s not as scary as it sounds. And pizza is something everyone enjoys making,” Tarbox said. “They’re nice and hearty dishes too and quite unique.”
Novice to advanced cooks are welcome to attend, with no prior experience necessary. Even the age demographic ranges in the classes, Tarbox said, from 12-year-olds to adults.
“After cooking up a storm [for the holidays] it’s nice to learn something new and get out of the cold and put on an apron and learn how to make some Italian food,” she said. 





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