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Sep 18, 2018







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Aaron Aranita, Segunda Vista (Sugartown Records)




Upheaval, Altar of Ash (Ghost Ramp Records)

I was trying to escape this desk and go back to binging on Black Mirror, and the roulette wheel stopped here, with a Boston-based band who’s gotten some love at Revolver magazine for this debut. The professed angle here is doom-metal, which should make you think of Sabbath and Candlemass and all that happy stuff, but the riffing on opener “Burning Dark” is more like a mix of High on Fire and (my go-to black-metal reference, because they were awesome) Bathory — matter of fact, singer Justin Doucette does a Quorthon imitation that’s bang-on, and, as you see, the logo and cover are right out of that meme about black-metal bands with unreadable logos. They bite on this riff like a dog with a squeaky chicken and don’t let go, and then … well, then we move on to “Eviscerate the Light,” and all Venom breaks loose, chaotic buzzsaw mayhem and all that, with some Cookie Monster growling and such. It’s pretty hard-ass, but, of course, nothing new whatsoever. B 
— Eric W. Saeger




Aaron Aranita, Segunda Vista (Sugartown Records)
CD Reviews: February 22, 2018

02/22/18
By Eric Saeger news@hippopress.com



 Aaron Aranita, Segunda Vista (Sugartown Records)

There’s a certain irresistible smoothness to saxophone jazz, as you know, whether your tastes run to small combos or big conglomerates like this, wherein this Hawaiian sax-player and composer, who’s written for the Brent Fischer Orchestra, is joined by them here. Aranita switched his preference to alto after seeing Gabe Balthazar play at a Burt Bacharach show, and that’s very much the feel of this breezy, relaxed, sometimes tumultuous collection, but with a bit of a twist, especially at the second tune, “Coração da Natureza,” which follows a “Girl from Ipanema” bossa nova formula and adds some chromatic anything-goes-ness to it. Big loud brass pocks “Epifanio,” a salsa-infused romp that’s over-inflated but perfect for what it is. This stuff is too big for casual background and really deserves full attention; Aranita’s nuanced work on here is often smart and subtle. A
— Eric W. Saeger





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