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Apr 21, 2018







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Step-by-step martini

1. Chill your cocktail glass.
2. Pour your spirit and vermouth into a Boston Shaker with ice and shake. The Boston Bartenders School suggests using 3 ounces of your spirit of choice and a half ounce of dry vermouth. 
3. Empty any ice in the glass and pour the contents of the shaker into the glass with a Hawthorne strainer.
4. Garnish with an olive or orange peel.
*Step 2 alternative: Pour directly into the glass and stir for a less diluted drink.




Behind the bar
How to make the perfect martini

04/02/15
By Ryan Lessard news@hippopress.com



How to make the perfect martini is a matter of much debate. Open one mixology book and it will describe one set of ingredients and ratios, but open another book and you’ll find another recipe.

Linda Robinson of East Hampstead teaches the art of drink mixing at the Boston Bartenders School in Nashua. 
“Your basic martinis have always been a spirit, either vodka or gin, with vermouth. Sometimes they can ask for it dry, extra dry or bone dry,” Robinson said.
The ratio between spirit and vermouth is usually a matter of preference. And if you ask for a dry martini in one bar, it may have a different notion of what that means than a bar just down the road. Robinson adheres to the training manual of the Boston Bartenders School, which says regular martinis should be made with 3 ounces of your spirit of choice and a half ounce of dry vermouth. 
“If somebody wants a dry martini, it's usually just a quarter ounce of vermouth versus a half ounce for regular. If it's extra dry, it's two dashes of vermouth ... and if it's bone dry, there's absolutely no vermouth,” Robinson said. 
Unless otherwise requested, regular martinis are garnished with olives and dry martinis get the twist (orange peel).
The choice of spirit plays a big role in the way the martini tastes. 
“The most popular martinis have always been gin, but vodka has now taken over that area. That's the new spirit that's more popular today,” Robinson said. 
Gin often has an aromatic quality from juniper and other botanicals. Some brands come with notes of citrus. Robinson attributes vodka's growing popularity to its more neutral qualities, which allow for fruitier ingredients to take over the flavor. But martini purists garnish the word “martini” with a big, fat asterisk when it’s used to describe a fruity drink.
“Making a good drink is like cooking,” Robinson said. “Every ingredient does matter and all of its ratios do matter.” 
 
As seen in the April 2, 2015 issue of the Hippo.





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