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Hippo staff favorites

The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway
Plot: An aging fisherman struggles with a giant marlin in the Gulf stream. The book won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1953 and is the last major work of fiction produced by the writer.
Published: 1952
Recommended by: Katie Ruiz, production department. “Hemingway paints a very detailed picture and keeps the reader interested the whole way through.”
 
Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? (And Other Concerns) by Mindy Kaling
Plot: Collection of short stories and anecdotes from Mindy Kaling’s personal and professional life, which also includes short rantings and lists of things she likes and dislikes.
Published: 2011
Recommended by: Ashley McCarty, layout designer. “It was an easy read and felt more like having a one-sided conversation with someone who is funny and fascinating all at the same time.”
 
Sookie Stackhouse novels by Charlaine Harris
Plot: The misadventures of a telepathic barmaid from Bon Temps, LA.
Recommended by: Kristin Crawford, printing department. “They’re fun, supernatural and a quick read. Perfect for summer. Dead to the World is my particular favorite.”
 
The Secret History by Donna Tartt
Plot: An eclectic group of Vermont students form a bond of friendship and exclusivity that leads to the murder of one of their own.
Published: 1992
Recommended by: Doreen Astbury, advertising department. “It carried so easily along the evolution of rationalization that by the story’s climax, I was wondering about the consistency of my own morality.”
 
The Art of Hearing Heartbeats by Jan-Philip Sendker
Plot: A successful New York lawyer disappears without a trace, save for a love letter he wrote many years ago to a Burmese women his family never heard of. His daughter travels to the village where the woman lived to uncover the truth.
Published: 2012
Recommended by: Charlene Cesarini, advertising director. “A book about pure, unconditional love, without sappiness, not a romance novel but more of a mystery/adventure. I could not put this book down while on vacation and I still think of it often.”
 
The Strange Life of Ivan Osokin by P.D. Ouspensky
Plot: A young man has the chance to relive his life.
Published: 1972
Recommended by: Lorian Jewett, advertising department. “The outcome has become my motto:
‘Your life is what it is because you are who you are. No blame is to fall elsewhere, as you are the master of your destiny.’”
 
To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf
Plot: A modernist classic set in a summer home along the coast of Scotland, filled with colorful and interesting characters. 
Published: 1927
Recommended by: Rebecca Fishow, staff writer. “Perfect for anyone looking to add a little philosophical introspection to their lazy summer days.”
 
The Martian Chronicles by Ray Bradbury
Plot: Short story collection loosely tied by the theme of humans colonizing Mars and trying to create a civilization on the planet.
Published: 1950
Recommended by: Austin Sorette, staff writer. “Bradbury’s stories touch on any interest a reader might have in a book: thrills, chills, romance, humor, and above all, an incredibly delicate writing style.”
 
The Time Traveler’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger
Plot: A librarian’s rare genetic disorder causes him to travel through time, which is also how he meets and falls in love with Clare Abshire.
Published: 2004
Recommended by: Emelia Attridge, staff writer. “This page-turner charmed me one summer and is now one of my all-time favorite books because of its real portrayal and emotions of a long distance relationship (over time) and enchanting characters.”
 
Where’d You Go, Bernadette by Maria Semple
Plot: A mother goes missing, so her daughter and husband travel to the ends of the earth  (literally, Antarctica) to find her. Epistolary novel told in letters, emails, etc.
Published: 2012
Recommended by: Kelly Sennott, staff writer. “You can tell Semple has written for television, including Arrested Development and Mad About You. I laughed and cried so hard I made three others (including two Hippo employees) read it too.”
 
Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers by Mary Roach
Plot: Includes anecdotes about the history and scientific research of cadaver use, and the human reaction to postmortem storage.
Published: 2003
Recommended by: Allie Ginwala, Seacoast Hippo staff writer. “Its fascinating factual content is told in a story-like way that I, a very squeamish person, didn’t expect to love so much.” 
 
Far From the Madding Crowd by Thomas Hardy
Plot: A fiesty heroine is loved by three very different men and ultimately must decide whether she wants passion or friendship. 
Published: 1874
Recommended by: Meghan Siegler, managing editor. “With beautiful language and complex, delightful characters, it’s a dramatic love story with surprising charm and humor.”




Books for the beach
A look at this summer's hottest reads

07/03/14
By Kelly Sennott ksennott@hippopress.com



You may have a little more downtime in the summer, but it’s probably still not enough to read all the books you want to read. So you’ve got to pick your titles carefully, lest you waste hours reading something that’s not worthy of your time.
Even when the New York Times says a book’s “captivating,” “witty” and “funny,” it can just as easily be “boring” and “long” and “stupid,” depending on your tastes. 
So here are some reviews by local librarians and booksellers. Taking a book recommendation from one of them is like taking one from your friend, coworker or family member in that they’re there — they can personally help you with your search, talk to you, hear about what you like and don’t like — before they make a suggestion. But they’ve also got recommendations for the general public, and the Hippo has called on them again to share their favorite new adult, YA, middle reader and audio book titles. Here’s what they came up with.
 
Most recommended new books
 
Euphoria by Lily King
Plot: Set in the 1930s, the book is based on an episode (and love triangle) in the life of anthropologist Margaret Mead.
Published: June 2014
Recommended by: Stefanie Kiper Schmidt of Water Street Bookstore. “My favorite for the summer. … The writing is quite beautiful.”
Also recommended by: Liberty Hardy of RiverRun Bookstore. “I hope this catapults Lily King into super stardom, because she's such an amazing writer.” And by Michael Herrmann, Gibson’s Bookstore owner. “The writing is lush, evocative and strong.” (King will be visiting Gibson’s Bookstore on Aug. 6.)
 
The Truth About the Harry Quebert Affair by Joel Dicker
Plot: Present-day story of an up-and-coming writer trying to unravel the mysterious circumstances around the accusations of murder heaped on his former writing professor for a young girl in 1973.
Published: May 2014
Recommended by: Willard and Holly Williams, co-owners of Toadstool Bookshops, written in a joint email. “A bestseller in France translated into English, but oddly enough, set in our own state of New Hampshire. … It’s funny, poignant in its execution.”
Also recommended by: Jean Paul Adriaansen of Water Street Bookstore (“A tantalizing mixture of mystery, romance, and suspense, all set in a typical NH town,” she said) and Regina Barnes of Milford Toadstool.
 
My Wish List by Grégoire Delacourt
Plot: A family woman and fabric-shop owner contemplates the dreams of her youth after winning the lottery, a fortune she decides to keep a secret while she reevaluates her adult choices and makes a list of the things she might want to change.
Published: March 2014
Recommended by: Deb Baker, Concord Public Library. “I enjoyed the main character’s reflections, her no-nonsense wit, and the surprising turn of events.” 
Also recommended by: Regina Barnes of Milford Toadstool. “My favorite novel of the past year features a woman who wins the lottery and tells no one.”
 
Delicious by Ruth Reichl 
Plot: A food writer named Billie Breslin travels from California to New York for a job at an iconic food magazine, Delicious! She discovers the magazine’s secret library is filled with letters from a 12-year-old to legendary chef James Beard during World War II.
Published: May 2014
Recommended by: Sue Carita at Milford Toadstool. “A delicious tale of a defunct food magazine, WWII correspondence involving James Beard, a young writer, some great delis, and more than a hint of romance served with a helping of quirkiness that will have you asking for seconds!”
Also recommended by: Willard and Holly Williams, co-owners of Toadstool Bookshops, written in a joint email. “The first novel from Ruth Reichl , famed restaurant critic and Gourmet editor that is as absolutely delicious as its title.”
 
All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr
Plot: A blind girl from France’s path converges with a brilliant German orphan during World War II. 
Published: May 2014
Recommended by: Brian Woodbury, manager at Milford Toadstool. “This book still haunts me weeks after I finished it.”
Also recommended by: Anna and Chris Miner, owners of Morgan Hill Bookstore
 
Thriller/suspense/crime, 2013-2014
 
Stolen by Daniel Palmer
Plot: When online gaming business owner Daniel Palmer steals his customer’s identity for the right insurance to cover his wife’s medical treatment. Turns out he’s picked the wrong customer.
Published: April 2013
Recommended by: Jan Locke of Milford Toadstool. “A plausible and terrifying novel of identity theft and insurance fraud.”
 
Fourth of July Creek by Smith Henderson
Plot: A social worker tries to help an 11-year-old boy in Montana with cataclysmic results.
Published: May 2014
Recommended by: Liberty Hardy of RiverRun Bookstore. “Read it, right now. I bet this book wins a major award this year.”
 
Dry Bones in the Valley by Tom Bouman
Plot: Henry Farrell is a policeman in a small rural Pennsylvania town who comes up against family feuds and meth makers, when the spring thaw reveals a body in the woods behind the house of the town eccentric.
Published: July 2014
Recommended by: Liberty Hardy of RiverRun Bookstore. “I loved this book so hard, and I am excited to hear more from him!”
 
The Golden Egg by Donna Leon
Plot: A man named Commissario Guido Brunetti investigates the death of man who never existed on paper.
Published: March 2013
Recommended by: Robbin Bailey, Concord Public Library
 
Natchez Burning by Greg Iles
Plot: The first installment of an epic trilogy that weaves crimes, lies and secret past into a thriller featuring Southern mayor and former prosecutor Penn Cage.
Published: February 2014
Recommended by: Anna and Chris Miner, co-owners of Morgan Hill Bookstore
 
An Untamed State by Roxane Gay
Plot: A woman is kidnapped in Haiti and held for a ransom her father is reluctant to pay.
Published: May 2014
Recommended by: Liberty Hardy of RiverRun Bookstore. “This book is so brutal and beautiful. … Ultimately, it’s about being broken and trying to find yourself among the pieces.”
 
Winter People by Jennifer McMahon
Plot: Nineteen-year-old Ruthie is convinced there’s something fishy with the old Vermont farmhouse they live in, and she’s proven right when, one morning, she wakes up to find her younger sister Alice has vanished. After finding an old diary hidden beneath the floorboards of her mother’s bedroom, she uncovers a similar case from the early 1900’s.
Published: February 2014
Recommended by: Jan Locke of Milford Toadstool. “More than a classic ghost story; add a touch of horror.”
 
All about love, 2013-2014
 
Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
Plot: A story of love and race, centered around a young man and woman from Nigeria, who face difficult choices and challenges in their home countries.
Published: January 2013
Recommended by: Katharine Nevins of MainStreet BookEnds in Warner. “The author modestly calls this a story about love and hair.  She also wrote Half of a Yellow Sun, and always writes with humor and insight of her Nigerian world, and her world here in America.”
 
How to Tell Toledo from the Night Sky by Lydia Netzer
Plot: It’s about a couple at the Toledo Institute of Astronomy who are literally meant to be together
Published: July 2014
Recommended by: Liberty Hardy of RiverRun Bookstore. “Lydia Netzer is one of the most original, refreshing voices writing today, and her new book. … is positively delightful. Strange enough to be unlike anything you've read and still plausible enough to be real, this book is a charmer.”
 
The Engagements by J. Courtney Sullivan
Plot: Four linked stories about couples connected by a diamond ring. Although fiction, it’s based on a real woman who developed the marketing campaign in the early 20th century that transformed the expensive diamond engagement ring from what was once a luxury into a required demonstration of a man’s love for his betrothed. (“A diamond is forever.”)
Published: January 2013
Recommended by: Carol Luers Eyman at the Nashua Public Library
 
All This Talk of Love by Christopher Castellani
Plot: Emotions run rampant in an Italian-American family as they plan a pilgrimage back to the mother’s home village. 
Published: February 2013
Recommended by: Carol Luers Eyman at the Nashua Public Library. “Some of the characters are endearing, others as annoying as the author intended them to be. I’m looking forward to reading more by Christopher Castellani after discovering his work last summer.”
 
Fast forward to the future, 2013-2014
 
Red Rising by Pierce Brown
Plot: Protagonist Darrow, a member of the lowest caste in a color-coded futuristic society, joins resistance group in order to infiltrate ruling class and destroy society from within.
Published: January 2014
Recommended by: Mat Bose, assistant director at Hooksett Library. “This book reminded me of The Hunger Games and Maze Runner series (which I also enjoyed very much). The imaginative plot and fast pace/suspense kept me reading late into the night. If you enjoy science fiction or dystopian future novels then you definitely should give this book a try.”
 
The Girl With All the Gifts by M.R. Carey
Plot: Post-apocalyptic novel about a girl named Melanie who longs to be like the children she reads about in her school books.
Published: June 2014
Recommended by: Liberty Hardy of RiverRun Bookstore. “The ending — did NOT see that coming. Fans of The Passage will really enjoy this!”
 
Bird Box by Josh Malerman
Plot: In the not-too-far future, un unknown contagion has started driving the people of the planet insane. The only way to avoid catching it is to hide themselves away. But what happens when their food and water run out? How can you fight an enemy you can't see?
Published: May 2014
Recommended by: Liberty Hardy of RiverRun Bookstore.
 
Fantasy/Science Fiction 2013-2014
 
Mage’s Blood by David Hair
Plot: Epic fantasy, similar to George R.R. Martin’s Ice and Fire series. It’s the first volume of Moontide Quartet.
Published: September 2013
Recommended by: Mat Bose, assistant director at Hooksett Library. “The author has created a fascinating world, featuring magic and intrigue, that is on the brink of war. I am eagerly awaiting the next installment in this series by David Hair.”
 
The Martian by Andy Weir
Plot: Astronaut Mark Watney becomes stranded alone on Mars and has to use his ingenuity to stay alive. 
Published: February 2014
Recommended by: Mat Bose, assistant director at Hooksett Library. “Watney’s  humorous personality and his struggle to survive combine to make this a captivating read.”
 
Historical fiction, 2013-2014
 
The Traitor’s Wife by Allison Pataki
Plot: The story of Benedict Arnold’s beautiful and manipulative wife Peggy, as told by her maid. She’s made to be the driving force behind one of the most treacherous acts in the country’s history.
Published: February 2014
Recommended by: Sandy Whipple at the Goffstown Public Library. “One of my favorite books of the year!”

The House Girl by Tara Conklin
Plot: A young lawyer is working on a difficult, historic class-action suit that seeks reparations for the descendents of American slaves. The book moves back and forth from this story to one in 1852, when 17-year-old Josephine Bell decides to run from the failing tobacco farm where she’s a slave, ultimately exploring what it means to repair a wrong and asking whether truth is sometimes more important than justice.
Published: February 2013
Recommended by: Sandy Whipple at the Goffstown Public Library
 
 
Nonfiction, 2012-2014
 
The Adventures of Buffalo and Tough Cookie by Dan Szcezesny
Plot: Dan Szczesny and his hiking companion Janelle complete New Hampshire’s lesser-known “52 With a View.” (He’s also an associate publisher at The Hippo.)
Published: 2013
Recommended by: Sandy Whipple at the Goffstown Public Library
 
Unorthodox: The Scandalous Rejection of My Hasidic Roots by Deborah Feldman
Plot: A memoir telling of a young Jewish woman’s escape from a religious sect.
Published: 2012
Recommended by: Sandy Whipple, Goffstown Public Library
 
January First: A Child's Descent into Madness and Her Father's Struggle to Save Her by Michael Schofield
Plot: A memoir telling of a father’s fight to save his child from a severe case of schizophrenia.
Published: 2012
Recommended by: Sandy Whipple, Goffstown Public Library
 
 
Essays and short stories, 2013-2014
 
The Opposite of Loneliness: Essays and Stories by Marina Keegan
Plot: Yale graduate Marina Keegan had a play that was being produced at the New York International Fringe Festival and a job waiting for her at The New Yorker, when she died five days after graduation in a car crash. She left behind a rich collection of essays and short stories.
Published: April 2014
Recommended by: Katharine Nevins of MainStreet BookEnds in Warner. “Fabulous writing from a young woman. … She had a lot to say.”
 
 
Miscellaneous, 2013-2014
 
The Lowland by Jhumpa Lahiri
Plot: The story of two very different brothers from Calcutta, about fate, will, exile, return and family.
Published: September 2013
Recommended by: Sandy Whipple at the Goffstown Public Library
 
And the Mountains Echoed by Khaled Housseini
Plot: Author of The Kite Runner, Housseini’s book explores the ways families nurture, wound, betray, honor and sacrifice for one another.
Published: May 2013
Recommended by: Sandy Whipple at the Goffstown Public Library
 
Little Island by Katharine Britton
Plot: The story of a complicated family as they come to make sense of old secrets and their grandmother’s final words: “grace … flowers … by the water … have fun.”
Published: September 2013
Recommended by: Katharine Nevins of MainStreet BookEnds in Warner. 
 
The Farm by Tom Rob Smith
Plot: A man named Daniel is caught between two very different stories — his mother’s and his father’s — and is at a loss of who to believe.
Published: September 2013
Recommended by: Jan Locke of Milford Toadstool. 
 
The Husband’s Secret by Liana Moriarty
Plot: Cecilia discovers an old letter that her husband wrote with a note saying to read it only in the event of his death. She cannot resist opening the letter and the contents have shocking ramifications.
Published: July 2013
Recommended by: Mat Bose, assistant director of Hooksett Library. “This novel is full of suspense and drama that will keep you fully engrossed. This book was chosen by library patrons as the winner of our March Madness Tournament of Books 2014 competition.”
 
The Patron Saint of Lost Dogs by Nick Trout
Plot: A vet goes home to Vermont to “revive” and sell his late father’s practice but gets caught up in the lives of both the animals and people in town.
Published: March 2013
Recommended by: Robbin Bailey, Concord Public Library
 
Plato at the Googleplex by Rebecca Newberger Goldstein
Plot: Rebecca Goldstein wonders what would happen if Plato came to life in the 21st century and embarked on a multi-city speaking tour. In the process she explains philosophy’s role in today’s debates on religion, morality, politics, and science. 
Published: March 2014
Recommended by: Sandi Lee, Concord Public Library. “This is a very popular title on a timeless subject.”
 
The Storied Life of AJ Fikry by Gabrielle Zevin
Plot: A bookstore owner named A.J. Fikry is depressed after losing his wife and witnessing the declining sales at his quirky bookstore, Island Books. To top it off, his prized possession, a rare collection of Poe poems, has been stolen. Things turn quickly when someone leaves a baby at his doorstep.
Published: April 2014
Recommended by: Liz Whaley of Water Street Bookstore. “It’s great for book lovers and lovers of bookstores.” It’s also favored among the rest of the Water Street Bookstore staff.
 
Reality Boy by A.S. King
Plot: Do you ever wonder what happens to children after shows like Nanny 911? Do those shows even tell the real story? Meet Gerald Faust, a former reality show "star," and find out what life is like after the cameras leave. 
Published: October 2013
Recommended by: Ellen Tweedy, Hooksett Library children’s librarian. “This is a gripping read that will challenge your views on "reality" television.”
 
The Bees by Laline Paull
Plot: It takes place in a beehive and centers around Flora 717, a sanitation worker, and it follows the trials and tribulations bees face, such as enemy wasps, cold spells and honey harvesting.
Published: May 2014
Recommended by: Liberty Hardy of RiverRun Bookstore. “Superb science fiction! … Laline Paull knows her bee stuff!”
 
Ghost Horse: A True Story of Love, Death and Redemption by Joe Layden
Plot: A racehorse trainer is moved to believe his late wife may have come back in the form of an unwanted filly.
Published: May 2013
Recommended by: Willard and Holly Williams, co-owners of Toadstool Bookshops.
 
For young adults, 2013-2014
 
The Fever by Megan Abbott
Plot: High school girls are suddenly afflicted with strange symptoms and they seem to be spreading.
Published: June 2014
Recommended by: Liberty Hardy of RiverRun Bookstore. “Abbott collects all the cattiness, crazy hormones and creepiness she showed in Dare Me to make The Fever another winner.
 
We Were Liars by E. Lockhart
Plot: The story of four friends and the soul-sucking power of money and privilege.
Published: May 2014
Recommended by: Stefanie Kiper Schmidt of Water Street Bookstore. “For YA, my favorite of the summer. …  It has an awesome ending that I did not see coming.”
 
My Life After Now by Jessica Verdi
Plot: A young teen realizes how bad life can get when you test HIV positive.
Published: April 2013
Recommended by: Denise Schaaf at the Goffstown Public Library.
 
Monument 14 series by Emmy Laybourne
Plot: Six high school kids, two eighth graders and six youngsters are trapped together in a chain superstar, built as refuge to protect themselves from the apocalyptic disaster (monster hailstorm, chemical weapons spill, etc.) going on outside. 
Published: Latest book, Savage Drift, came out May 2014
Recommended by: Denise Schaaf at the Goffstown Public Library
 
Canary by Rachele Alpine
Plot: The daughter of a prep school coach must decide between speaking out about an assault or risk destroying her father’s career and bringing down the hometown heroes. The book is told in a mix of prose and verse.
Published: August 2013
Recommended by: Denise Schaaf at the Goffstown Public Library
 
The Madman’s Daughter by Megan Shepherd
Plot: Inspired by H.G. Wells’s The Island, the book follows a girl from London and her search to uncover the truth about her mad scientist father.
Published: January 2013
Recommended by: Denise Schaaf at the Goffstown Public Library
 
The F It List by Julie Halpern
Plot: A strained friendship between two teens is strengthened by one girl’s battle with cancer.
Published: November 2013
Recommended by: Denise Schaaf at the Goffstown Public Library
 
Golden Boy by Tara Sullivan
Plot: An albino boy named Habo flocks with his family from their Tanzanian village to Mwanza. Here he faces the realization of just how dangerous it is to be an albino; the book follows his chase from the machete-carrying hunters who believe albino body parts bring good luck.
Published: June 2013
Recommended by: Denise Schaaf at the Goffstown Public Library
 
 
For middle grade readers, 2013-2014
 
The Luck Uglies by Paul Durham
Plot: In Village Drowning, strange things are happening, which makes 11-year-old Rye O’Chanter believe a beast called Bog Noblins has come out of extinction. Rye’s only hope is an exiled secret society called the Luck Uglies.
Published: April 2014
Recommended by: Jill Sweeney-Bosa of Water Street Bookstore. “It enthralled, warmed my heart, tickled my funny bone, and left me eager for a return visit to Village Drowning." It’s also favored among the rest of the staff.
 
Under the Egg by Laura Marx Fitzgerald 
Plot: Thirteen-year-old Theodora Tenpenny discovers a priceless painting in her Greenwich Village home.
Published: March 2014
Recommended by: Sue Carita, Milford Toadstool. “Mystery, fun, and a whole new way to see a museum!”
 
 
As seen on screen
 
Call the Midwife (Volumes 1, 2 and 3) by Jennifer Worth
Plot: The trilogy of books describes Jennifer Worth’s life as a nurse and midwife in London’s East End during the 1950’s. She wrote the book after retiring from a subsequent career as a musician.
Published: The first was originally published in 2002. It has since been adapted for TV.
Recommended by: Katharine Nevins of MainStreet BookEnds in Warner. “If you have enjoyed the PBS adaptation, the real journals will astound you.  Realistic, honest, informative, the best in healthcare.”
 
The Fault in Our Stars by John Green
Plot: Today’s Romeo & Juliet, except instead they’re fighting cancer.
Published: 2012
Recommended by: Sandy Whipple at the Goffstown Public Library
 
 
Published 2012 and earlier 
 
Syndrome E by Franck Thilliez
Plot: A woman receives a panicked phone call from an ex-lover who has developed a rare disorder after watching an obscure film from the 1950’s. 
Published: August 2012 (paperback just recently)
Recommended by: Brian Woodbury, manager at Milford Toadstool. “My favorite thriller of late is finally in paperback! This chilling novel of mind control spans the globe, from the Cold War to the present day.”
 
The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry by Rachel Joyce
Plot: An older man sets out to walk the entire length of Great Britain in response to a letter he received from an old friend in hospice.
Published: 2012
Recommended by: Katharine Nevins of MainStreet BookEnds in Warner. “Quiet story with amazing depth.”
 
The Birth House by Ami McKay
Plot: In Nova Scotia, a midwife and her apprentice work to protect birthing traditions in face of modern medicine.
Published: 2006
Recommended by: Sandy Whipple, Goffstown Public Library
 
The Virgin Cure by Ami McKay
Plot: A young girl is sold into servitude in the late 1800’s in New York.
Published: 2011
Recommended by: Sandy Whipple, Goffstown Public Library
 
The Bloodletter’s Daughter by Linda Lafferty
Plot: About the effort to hide a secret about the city of Prague — that the emperor’s bastard son, Don Julius, is afflicted with madness — and of the people afflicted by this insanity.
Published: 2012
Recommended by: Sandy Whipple, Goffstown Public Library
 
Ketchup Clouds by Annabel Pitcher
Plot: Fifteen-year-old Zoe has a terrible, dark secret she can’t confess to anyone she knows, so she divulges it to a criminal on death row.
Published: 2012
Recommended by: Denise Schaaf at the Goffstown Public Library
 
 

 






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