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L’Chayim Jewish Food Festival

When: Sunday, Oct. 18, from noon to 3 p.m.
Where: Temple Adath Yeshurun, 152 Prospect St., Manchester
Free admission. Food priced per item. See taynh.org




Bring on the brisket
Festival returns to Manchester temple

10/15/15
By Allie Ginwala aginwala@hippopress.com



 On a recent Thursday morning, Cate Tanzer, Ruthie Gordon and Rabbi Beth Davidson were busy cooking at Temple Adath Yeshurun, preparing for the second annual L’Chayim Jewish Food Festival, taking place in Manchester on Sunday, Oct. 18.

“Last year … we said we’ll try it and wing it and see if people are interested,” Cate Tanzer, festival co-chair, said in a phone interview. “And everyone really [was], so we came back and took recommendations from people, and we tweaked it a little bit.”
The festival will feature Jewish food favorites like kugel, stuffed cabbage, matzo ball soup, rugellah, teiglach and strudel, along with this year’s additions of corned beef and pastrami sandwiches.
Though the L’Chayim Jewish Food Festival is only in its second year, Temple Adath Yeshurun hosted a slightly different event a decade ago that was part of the inspiration for this festival.
“We wanted to bring it back and with more food,” Tanzer said.
“Manchester is just a diverse community and we all express our culture through our food,” Rabbi Davidson said in a phone interview. “Highlighting Jewish food was a way for us to highlight our [culture] and I think particularly in this day and age the more people that know about the cultures that make up our community, the better our community is.”
Many people within the Jewish community attended last year, though Davidson was surprised at the turnout from the community in general. With the diverse crowd, she said adding an educational component, like tours of the sanctuary, would be a great way to introduce people to the temple and Jewish culture.
“We had so many people from outside the Jewish community, and they had never tasted stuffed cabbage or the matzo ball soup,” Tanzer said. “We’re having gallons of matzo ball soup.” 
They’re preparing for a big crowd with 180 pounds of brisket, 100 pounds of pastrami and corned beef deli meat, 10 pounds of sweet noodle kugel and 50 to 60 pounds of cabbage. 
    Gordon, co-chair for the festival, said the most popular items at last year’s festival were brisket, stuffed cabbage and matzo ball soup.
“Because they smell so good, [it’s] no surprise at all,” she said in a phone interview. “The brisket and the stuffed cabbage, the smell of that is so savory.”
Most of the food will be prepared in advance. On the day of the event, about two dozen people will be onsite to take orders and answer questions. 
Guests can enjoy their brisket and kugel in the temple’s social hall or take it in a to-go container to enjoy at home during the football game. 
“We made sure it wasn’t going to be the same time at the Patriots game,” Davidson said, noting that the festival ends at 3 p.m., more than an hour before the game starts.
Corned beef, pastrami and brisket by the pound were the most popular takeaway items last year, though stuffed cabbage, matzo ball soup and more will be ready and served in to-go containers. 
“This is a great opportunity to get your food, take it home and enjoy the game,” Tanzer added. 





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