The Hippo

HOME| ADVERTISING| CONTACT US|

 
Dec 10, 2018







NEWS & FEATURES

POLITICAL

FOOD & DRINK

ARTS

MUSIC & NIGHTLIFE

POP CULTURE



BEST OF
CLASSIFIEDS
ADVERTISING
CONTACT US
PAST ISSUES
ABOUT US
MOBILE UPDATES
LIST MY CALENDAR ITEM


Catie Curtis, While We’re Here (self-released)




Feelies, In Between (BarNone Records)

Arguably most famous for their 1988 college-jangle-indie single “Away,” this New Jersey four-or-fivesome-depending-on-the-year has splintered off a large number of side projects and bands over their 40 years of on-and-off activity, all usually pointed at the same general audience as the main band: repressed crook-leg-dancers who prefer bands whose singers only got the job by picking the shortest straw — a kinder, gentler ascendant of grunge. In this, their sixth proper album, neither the recipe nor the ingredients have changed much, except that now the stubborn, driving jangle doesn’t come off as youthful, more like models for the tunes on A Mighty Wind. “Turn Back Time” is dishwasher-safe twee; “Stay the Course” reads like Wire without any effects pedals, and “Pass the Time” revisits the varying-tempo shtick they pulled 35 years ago on “Sooner or Later” but with a decided lack of urgency. All that being said, the songs are a bit infectious as always — they’ve certainly not lost that ability. A- — Eric W. Seager




Catie Curtis, While We’re Here (self-released)
CD Reviews: January 12, 2016

01/12/17
By Eric Saeger news@hippopress.com



 Like so many other famous folk-rockers who peaked before hip-hop took over everything, Curtis is without major label support these days, this new record having been financed through Kickstarter. She’s still based in Boston, recently separated from her wife of 17 years but apparently not too devastated by it, or at least not in the mood to rehash it to death, let alone re-examine the slings and arrows she suffered after coming out in her hometown of Saco, Maine, so many years ago, songwriting fodder she’s already used. Yes, her keyboard-driven passages can get mawkish (“The Dying Side”) and she’s sounding a bit old to be resurrecting the Tracy Chapman/Paula Cole era, which, thankfully, she doesn’t attempt too often here. No, mostly it’s simple, cheerful pastel Americana about comings and goings, redolent of Mary Chapin Carpenter (who seems to like her a lot) if anything. Some nice bluegrass feel on the strummy “Please Explain”; some Sheryl Crow flavor to the title track. A- 






®2018 Hippo Press. site by wedu