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Sep 18, 2018







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Gucci Mane, DropTopWop (Atlantic Records)

This Atlanta rapper may have pioneered trap, but of course it was Baauer’s “Harlem Shake” that won the meme crown as well as the collective heart of the internet, with YouTuber Filthy Frank’s “pink guy” version alone now up to 58 million views at this writing. It wasn’t just luck (or the fact that he’s white), though; Baauer steered directly toward the EDM-trap crossover opportunity that presented itself and made way too many people forget that Gucci and all those other guys had blazed the trail. Gucci hasn’t done much this year, just an EP with Shawty Redd (3 for Free), a surprise being that he released a bunch of records while he was doing prison time on gun charges, and it’s a bit odd that the song celebrating his revived-BFF-age song with Nicki Minaj, “Make Love,” isn’t here. The snoozy Rick Ross collab (“Loss for Words”) is, though, as are visits from Chainz and Offset, etc., and the vocals aren’t delivered through a land line, so it counts as punching the clock. Bling, disses, drawling, the usual. B — Eric W. Saeger




CD reviews: June 15, 2017
Lindsey Buckingham and Christine McVie, Lindsey Buckingham and Christine McVie (Atlantic Records)

06/15/17
By Eric Saeger news@hippopress.com



Lindsey Buckingham and Christine McVie, Lindsey Buckingham and Christine McVie (Atlantic Records)

This is actually Fleetwood Mac without Stevie Nicks, who for some reason didn’t want to transport herself back to 1979 and the same studio the band used to record the Tusk LP. It’s Mick Fleetwood on drums, John McVie on bass, and a whole lotta throwback bubble-pop, which ranges from great (most of what Christine had a hand in, such as “Feel About You,” which steers toward the same lazy pants-itching longing as 1987’s “Everywhere” but without any truly absorbing counterpoint) to middling (kickoff tune “Sleeping around the Corner” sounds like something John Cougar would have tossed in the rubbish for being too vanilla). Nicks is sorely missing on “Red Sun,” an uninspired Crosby Stills and Nash-esque hippie humbug that could have been better if it were slightly underproduced. The CSN-soundalike problem surfaces a few times, including on “Love is Here to Stay,” which at least evinces that Buckingham is definitely into the whole trip, tabling some highbrow finger-picking that even an exuberant chorus fails to save. B- — Eric W. Saeger
 





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