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Delerium, Mythologie (Metropolis Records)




Holy Sons, In the Garden (Partisan Records)

Portlandian songwriter-drummer Emil Amos, the only person in this project, is a bit of an enigma, an ex-druggie who barely does any shows but, more to the point, has a habit of changing his entire vocal technique album to album, having had a Neil Young-soundalike period and so on. He’s also contributed multi-instrumentalist duties on records from Grails and Om, if that matters to you, but one of the other things in play here is his songwriting prolificness, which, as I’ve stated before somewhere, can tend to spell mediocrity, especially if you subscribe to the theory that many of the songs written by “prolific songwriters” should just have been combined in the first place. That said, this is a dreamy little slice of lo-fi indie-pop steeped in a 1970s-radio fetish — for example, opening track “Robbed and Gifted”’s sideways resemblance to Gerry Rafferty’s “Right Down the Line.” Amos’s voice tends to stay low and po-faced here, stopping to yodel a bit in the mud-caked Ryan Adams-ish “Denmark.” Despite the “lo-fi” tag, though, all the songs display obvious care, which is an awesome thing to behold when it’s done this well. A Eric W. Saeger




Delerium, Mythologie (Metropolis Records)
CD Reviews: October 13, 2016

10/13/16
By Eric Saeger news@hippopress.com



Delerium, Mythologie (Metropolis Records)

For decades now, since incorporating this Front Line Assembly side project, Bill Leeb and Rhys Fulber have pushed the limits of sexiness in house-techno. Working with opera singers and pop idols like Sarah McLachlan, they build aural equivalents of the Venus de Milo, transcending the sugar-coated house-moll space to explore a Shangri-La of female-sung techno beauty that really has no equal. DJs like Tiesto and Above & Beyond would agree, having remixed a few Delerium tunes, and the line to remix some of this album’s songs is already filling up, with guys like Matt Lange, Alex Klingle and Blush having already taken a shot at “Ritual,” the original form of which is next-gen in intent, featuring the mononymed Phildel draping her soprano over swirling, trap-propelled synth lines. Opener “Blue Fires” is a similar animal but with a rainier feel; “Zero” takes a more snap-dance approach; “Keep on Dreaming” flirts with a tribal-electro steez. Stunning, top-drawer stuff as always. A+ 





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