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Jul 17, 2018







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Delorean, Pythagorean Dream (Phlex Records)




Black Tape for a Blue Girl, These Fleeting Moments (Metropolis Records) 

Boy, it’s been a while since we dared venture into the faithless, crimson, forlorn, etc. depths of the goth scene, hasn’t it? And we’re sort of lucky to be doing this now, as this is the 11th album from recent Oregon transplant Sam Rosenthal, who heads up this Black Tape project, which counts among its fans the creme de la creme of Wingnutland, including David Lynch, Poppy Z. Brite and porn star-turned-wannabe-artiste Sasha Grey. Although the hashtags associated with this band (which now includes Dresden Dolls’ Brian Viglione, apparently whenever he feels like it) pointed to fuzzy-jackboot darkwave (the girl from Cruxshadows was once involved in this), I was nonetheless expecting Bauhaus, and wasn’t disappointed, upon opening track “The Vastness of Life,” whose 17-count-‘em minutes begin with some dreary soliloquy about alienation, then shift into Swans-ambient mode, then some string-powered weirdness that made me think of that J-Lo movie The Cell, then some 1970s synths straight out of Rush underneath more whining and pining. I’ll stop now, except to say that it’d be great soundtracking for a Poppy Brite-written movie directed by David Lynch, starring Sasha Grey, in other words something I wouldn’t be able to stomach for five minutes. B- 




Delorean, Pythagorean Dream (Phlex Records)
CD Reviews: August 4, 2016

08/04/16
By Eric Saeger news@hippopress.com



Delorean, Pythagorean Dream (Phlex Records) 

Even if the world wrongly continues to turn up its nose at this Barcelona, Spain-based alternative-dance band’s approach, there are some good stories for the band members to tell their grand-kids, like the one about getting kidnapped in Mexico City (they were eventually rescued by the cops). I didn’t personally dislike the band’s third album, Subiza, even if its MGMT-beholden, trance-inspired understatements got a bit repetitive; there was plenty of accessible stuff for remixers to work with. Next came the Apar album, its more pronounced vocals and fractals lending a feel of 1980s-jacked nu-rave for grown-ups. This brings us to Muzik, which initially feels like a return to the ghostly feel of Subiza, going by opening track “Epic,” a hybrid of prog-house and modulated-vocal-powered “Halcyon and On”-era Orbital. What I’m trying to say is that it’s very pretty and very summery, as is the Pet Shop Boys-ish title track. It’s all awesome as far as I’m concerned, but as I alluded to earlier, the house-remix community have to get hip to it, which will require proaction on the band’s part. B-





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