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Durg, One Chance (self-released)




Durg, One Chance (self-released)
CD Reviews: February 4, 2016

02/04/16
By Eric Saeger news@hippopress.com



Head north, then more north, then bang a left and you’ll be in White River Junction, Vermont, home to singer-songwriter Christian Durgin, whose first LP is on the docket here, featuring contributions from Manchester/Concord musicians Patrik Gochez (Pat & The Hats) and George Laliotis. That’s all the background I have handy, so we can get to the specifics of these songs, mostly of a fedora-hat drink-and-stumble pub-jam stripe. The most unappetizing of these songs, hands down, is “Fever,” which makes its Grateful Dead point in one verse but slogs on for a total of over seven minutes, which, if the soloing was 4-star, would be survivable, but it’s not, and the microwaved wakka-wakka jam-out eventually runs out of steam and blurs into every other government-issue garage-noodling thing you’ve ever heard from your own townies. Opener “Where Did You Go” fares much better, emanating a steez that combines Tom Petty with late-1960s radio-pop (Durgin’s voice goes a bit Bowie here as well, which is a sliver outside the rank-and-file norm). “Brain Pollution,” along with a few other tunes, evinces a Train-meets-Pavement formula that certainly has potential. B- 






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