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“Annie Oak” shares stories of migration. Courtesy photo.




Enchanted Fall Festival

Where: Massabesic Audubon Center, 26 Deerneck Road, Auburn
When: Saturday, Oct. 18, from 4 to 8 p.m.
Cost: $10 for members, $20 for nonmember families in advance; $15 for members and $25 for nonmember families on the day of.
Call: 668-2045
Visit: nhaudubon.org




Enchanted trips
Stories of migration told by the birds and the trees

10/16/14



Every year, the Enchanted Fall Festival at the Massabesic Audubon Center welcomes autumn with season-themed games, raffles and refreshments. This year, to celebrate its 100th birthday, the center is basing many activities on the theme “migration through time.”

“We continue to have this event because it is very kid-friendly, and a lot of families come out for the festival,” said  Beverly Youree, chairperson of the Fall Festival Committee and a volunteer with the Audubon Center. “We’re celebrating the Audubon Center’s 100th birthday … and so we thought, ‘What kind of theme would have a long history to it?’, and migration was the answer.”
A puppet show called “Oliver Eagle Migrates South” will premiere at the festival, which will take place on Saturday, Oct. 18. According to Youree, Oliver Eagle will recount his chronicles of travel down to his migration destination in Central America.
Along the way, she said, he encounters species like an owl, a goldfinch, a cardinal and a toucan who give him the lowdown on the flow along his flight path. But upon his arrival in Florida, a sneaky alligator will be waiting for him to deter his trip.
Returning for a second year, a volunteer will dress as “Annie Oak,” an oak tree that will also share stories she has heard from several migrating birds who have used her branches as pit stops over the past 100 years.
To give migration a more human element, Carol Nepton, who is Native American and a member of the Audubon Center, will share stories on how migration impacted New Hampshire’s first people. Youree claimed that tribes in New Hampshire followed similar migration patterns, traveling to the South in the colder months and returning north in spring.
The festival won’t forgo its classic events; Youree said that the Massabesic Center has brought back its popular pop-up tent, which is setup in the middle of the Audubon’s auditorium. Inside the tent, 35 pictures of birds from around the country will be on display, and participants are supposed to guess what kind of bird they are looking at based on its physical features and its migration patterns.
“The pictures of the birds have been donated by friends of mine,” Youree said. “One of my friends submitted a picture of a puffin found on one of the islands between Maine and Nova Scotia. It looks like it could be a portrait [because of] the way he was able to get the bird and eliminate the fuzz of the background.”
Also taking over the auditorium will be the animal friends at Wildlife Encounters. Youree said that in the past, participants have gotten an up-close look at animals like turtles and frogs.
Another favorite, Youree said, is the big bonfire behind the Audubon Center, where participants can sit and roast marshmallows. 
Bluegrass musicians are taking over the barn next to the Audubon Center’s main building, and the event will also feature face-painters and treats like cookies and apple cider.
“There’s always so much enthusiasm for the event, we tend to forget how much hard work it takes to put this on,” Youree laughed. 
 
As seen in the October 16, 2014 issue of the Hippo.





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