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Jul 17, 2018







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Erasure, World Be Gone (Mute Records)




Dion Lunadon, Dion Lunadon (Agitated Records)

First solo record from the New Zealand bassist, who’s most recognizable from his time with New Yawk-based noise-rockers A Place to Bury Strangers, a band that recalls Bauhaus mixing things up with a buzzed-out doppelganger of DZ Deathrays on its best days, which is mighty cool. Matter of fact, for this release, I’d have been plenty happy with Lunadon taking his best shot at trying to outdo his APTBS bandmates, but (and this looked to be even better) his aim here was a more raw punk thing, purportedly more along the lines of Toy Love and The Gun Club, which translates to Richard Hell and stuff if you’re older. But that description doesn’t give this record anywhere near enough credit — this thing is sick, like Johnny Thunders with an occasional shot of Gravity Kills, meaning hard-ass Velvet Underground with an on-the-phone vocal effect-box stolen from the Horrors when they were awesome. Indiscriminate wreckage that’ll fix your head for sure. A- — Eric W. Saeger




Erasure, World Be Gone (Mute Records)
CD Reviews: June 22, 2017

06/22/17
By Eric Saeger news@hippopress.com



Erasure, World Be Gone (Mute Records)

For Gen-Xers who want to feel old, it’s been 29 years since this British synthpop band released their biggest, most upbeat, most yawn-inducing commercial single, “Chains of Love,” a song that, when it played over dancehall loudspeakers, was probably dismissed as a Wham B-side. After all, it had the same rich falsetto hook, prototypical 1980s keyboard sound and all that stuff, and Wham (not to mention Simple Minds and all those guys) were eating these guys’ lunch, but at least it was an effort. WBG, the band’s 17th album, puts its best foot forward, with the irresistible “Love You to the Sky,” boasting a no-brainer hook that I bet they wished they’d written a lot earlier in their career. The title track is a Corey Hart-style pseudo-ballad that’s of course better than anything Corey Hart could have ever come up with, and speaking of that, singer Andy Bell sounds a lot like Hart these days, which is unfortunate. “Take Me Out of Myself” nicks Peabo Bryson, at which point it’s safe to write this whole effort off as dated throwbackism exclusively geared toward fans, although “Oh What a World” dredges up an image of Boyz II Men.





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