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Stacey Cooper presents a bucket of greens. Courtesy photo.




Growing Shoots & Sprouts at Home

When: Tuesday, Jan. 26, from 6 to 7:30  p.m.
Where: Concord Fire Department, 24 Horseshoe Pond Lane, Concord
Tickets: $20
Visit: concordfoodcoop.coop/classes




Feeling green?
Grow shoots and sprouts in the midst of winter

01/21/16
By Allie Ginwala aginwala@hippopress.com



 Don’t let your green thumb freeze this winter. Instead, learn how to bring some plant life right into your home with Concord Food Co-op’s home gardening winter workshops beginning on Tuesday, Jan. 26.

The first in a three-part mini series presented in partnership with Canterbury Shaker Village, Growing Shoots & Sprouts at Home is an introductory class for those who want fresh (and easy to grow) greens all season long.
“[It’s] good when local greens are harder to come by, good to fill in the nutrition gap,” said Stacey Cooper, Shaker Village organic garden manager for Concord Food Co-op. “We wanted to support both Canterbury Shaker Village’s and the Co-op’s vision of bringing education to the community and raise awareness of health food systems.”
The beginner-friendly class will start with a Powerpoint presentation to introduce everyone to the topic. 
Cooper explained that sprouts are seeds grown without any medium; just dampen them and place them in a container like a mason jar or bucket for three to five days.
Shoots requires a medium, like potting soil, and grow a bit longer, until they put out their first leaves. Commonly known shoots are sunflowers, corn and peas.
“We’ll go over some of the home safety protocol, food safety concerns … then into the procedure part, so shoots versus sprouts, different environments, sanitation, timing,” she said.
For the workshop, guests will be provided with the necessary materials for growing — an egg carton filled with potting soil for the shoots and a mason jar for the sprouts — so everyone can make their first batch.
Cooper is planning to have alfalfa and broccoli sprouts and pea shoots which she said are “delicious … a little taste of spring,” plus they’re seeds that have a reliable germination and growth pattern. She’ll also have samples of recipes like sprout hummus to give an idea of ways to prepare raw sprouts and shoots.
The next two classes in the series are Starting Seeds, Direct Sowing & Transplanting Your Own Veggie Garden on Feb. 20 and Implementing a Permanent Raised Bed System on April 23. Each class is an independent topic, Cooper said, and the subject matter does get a bit more advanced as they progress.
Cooper said the classes are helpful for people who need a little help getting through the winter.
“[We hope to] inspire people hopefully to take ownership of their health and maybe provide inspiration for a little self-sufficiency as far as home gardeners go,” she said. 





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