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Sep 23, 2018







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Felly, Wild Strawberries (self-released)




Brand New, Science Fiction (Procrastinate Music Traitors Records)

This is the first LP in eight years for the Long Island emopoppers, who first charted in 2003 with “The Quiet Things That No One Ever Knows,” a factory-stamped half-Weezer-half-Cheap Trick jaunt fronted by an incongruous video about a chick who got in a car accident, or something of that sort. That takes us to here, where they’ve been threatening to disband or change their sound, and it looks like the latter’s taken place, at least insofar as the opener tune “Lit Me Up” is concerned. Its overlong intro involves ominous, slow, echoing guitar chords trudging underneath a psycho-ward skit that goes on for two minutes, and, just when you’re expecting some sort of black metal screeching into your face, it evolves into a psychedelic “Major Tom” bum-out without any major-chord respite. A new direction it certainly is, with “Waste” nicking Coldplay at their most maudlin and “137,” driven by desolate Ennio Morricone/Chris Isaak bare-windswept-desert arpeggios, driving away any last original fans who might be left. Not bad for what it is, but they probably should have just broken up or renamed the band, really. B — Eric W. Saeger




Felly, Wild Strawberries (self-released)
CD Reviews: September 21, 2017

09/21/17
By Eric Saeger news@hippopress.com



Felly, Wild Strawberries (self-released)

Before you write this off as “See-Tee in the hooouse” and assume this white Connecticut-raised 21-year-old to be Mac Miller with Def Leppard hair (OK, he’s been compared to Miller, granted), you should note that this kid has spent a lot of time creating and peddling beats, not just relying on his raps, and he’s got millions of Soundcloud plays to prove it. His main influences, Bob Marley and Rage Against the Machine, load his head up with a unique, wide-open palette that he hasn’t utilized fully until (so he’s insinuated) this mixtape, however the emphasis here is heavy on the Marley. This stuff is positive, even if the bullet description of it could be condensed to woozy head-trip swirl on the synths, boyband-bedroom-chill and trap beatage. Trip Carter guest-features on two tunes, as does Frex. B- — Eric W. Saeger





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