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Home brewed kombucha. Courtesy of Mariah Kimball.




The Art of Brewing Kombucha

Where: Derry Public Library, 64 E. Broadway, Derry 
When: Monday, July 31, 6:30 p.m. 
Cost: Free 
Visit: derrypl.org/2017/07/kombucha




Fizzy tea
Learn how to brew kombucha at home

07/27/17
By Angie Sykeny asykeny@hippopress.com



 Mariah Kimball first tried kombucha a few years ago while she was sick with the flu. Shortly after, she started making her own, and now she wants to help others do the same. 

On Monday, July 31, Kimball will teach a free class at Derry Public Library on The Art of Brewing Kombucha, a fermented black tea Kimball says is known for its unique taste and health benefits, particularly for gut health and digestion. 
“I’m passionate about health and wellness, and I know sometimes health things can be overwhelming,” she said, “but drinking kombucha is one thing that is really easy to implement and totally doable for a lot of people.”
The taste, she said, is a cross between juice and soda and is similar to a Twisted Tea, but it has only trace amounts of alcohol. 
“It’s kind of fizzy and has a little bite to it, but with that black tea flavor,” she said. 
Kimball will begin the class by talking about what kombucha is and the health benefits of drinking it. Then, she’ll talk through the step-by-step process of making it at home. 
You start, she said, by brewing black tea and putting it in a gallon container — a pickle jar works well — along with the scoby (the name is an acronym for “symbiotic culture of bacteria and yeast”) used for kombucha. Let it sit at room temperature and ferment for about two weeks. 
Once that first fermentation period is done, you may choose to add flavor to the kombucha using fruit or herbs. Kimball’s go-to is mixed berry and ginger, but you can do all kinds of creative combinations like hibiscus and jasmine, apple and cinnamon and others. 
To flavor the drink, let the fruits or herbs sit in it for one to two days. After that, it’s ready to drink. 
After talking through the process, Kimball will hold a question-and-answer time. She’ll bring physical examples of kombucha in different fermentation stages and some finished drinks for people to taste. Then, she’ll send each person home with instructional handouts and a scoby culture so they can start making kombucha on their own at home. 
The culture can only be acquired by knowing someone who makes kombucha. If you can’t make it to the class, Kimball said you can contact her directly to get a culture, or there are Facebook groups in which kombucha makers arrange to share the culture with others. 
“When I started brewing it, no one knew what it was, but it’s becoming more mainstream now,” she said. “It’s so beneficial and it tastes so good, people are starting to catch on and take notice.” 





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