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 See “Celebrating Flight”

Where: Aviation Museum, 27 Navigator Road, Londonderry
When: Sept. 5 through Oct. 18
Reception: Friday, Sept. 4, 6-8 p.m.; there will be awards, light refreshments and artists present.
Contact: aviationmuseumofnh.org, 669-4820




Flying art
Aviation Museum’s first professional juried show

08/27/15
By Kelly Sennott ksennott@hippopress.com



 “Celebrating Flight” is the perfect theme for the Aviation Museum, but it’s also an inspiring topic for art in general, said Bruce McColl, the juror for the museum’s latest show and the director of the Currier Art Center in Manchester.

“At the Currier, we’ve experimented and engaged with themes of flight with our art camp on a pretty regular basis,” McColl said. “These ideas around flight are incredibly exciting for people of all ages, but especially children.”
The theme also offers profoundness, metaphorical possibilities and nostalgia, all of which McColl found among the museum’s 60 submissions. He narrowed those down to 30 for the museum’s first-ever juried show open to professional artists. “Celebrating Flight” will open with a reception Friday, Sept. 4.
Submissions came from artists of all media — paintings, photos and sculpture — and experiences. Decorating the art were hot air balloons, beach scenes with flying seagulls, airplane paintings and airplane photos. 
There were also a handful of abstract pieces, like Charlie Lemay’s “Fear of Flight,” a photo of a young girl with arms stretched out. Stephen Bourque’s “Clear!” was a painting that showcased two young kids playing on a tiny toy airplane.
The only sculpture of the show: “Fly While You Are Able” by renowned New Hampshire artist Jon Brooks. Made from wood, acrylic and lacquer, it depicts a winged creature about to take off. It was a show finalist, as were three other works: “Up and Away” by Don Jalbert, a plane photo by Richard Neville and “First Solo” by Robert Brun.
“[First Solo] really illustrates a dramatic scene that relates to flight, and it’s executed beautifully. It’s a plane flying through a snowstorm from a really dramatic bird’s eye view,” McColl said. “It was really dramatic, and I thought there was a suspended narrative quality to it.”
He also liked Jalbert’s piece, a painting of children playing in a meadow with handmade planes. McColl grew up going to air shows in Michigan with his dad, and it reminded him of being a kid again, dreaming about aviation.
“It was the innocence of that painting that really captured what I think is a common childhood experience, imagining what flight could be like,” he said.
Prizes go to the winners, which will be announced the night of the reception, as will the museum choice award, announced by Jessica Pappathan, who said during an interview at the museum that she was very pleased with the variety and number of pieces submitted, with plans to present a show next year as well.
Prizes include a donated Currier Museum of Art family membership and a donated $50 gift certificate to  Framers Market. 





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