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Merrimack Music Series Location: City Auditorium Reception Lobby, 2 Prince St., Concord Admission: First come, no tickets, no charge. Donations accepted Information: 344-4747 All shows start at 3 p.m. Each act plays one hour Sunday, March 2 – Kenny Wei




Merrimack Music Series

Location: City Auditorium Reception Lobby, 2 Prince St., Concord
Admission: First come, no tickets, no charge. Donations accepted
Information: 344-4747
 
All shows start at 3 p.m. Each act plays one hour
Sunday, March 2 – Kenny Weiland & Brad Myrick Duo /Diamond Joe
Sunday, March 9 – Ellen Theresa Fagan /Lauren Hurley
Sunday, March 16 – The Mica-Sev Project /Ian Ethan Case
Sunday, March 23 – Joel Morse & Freeland Hubbard /Jordan Tirrell-Wysocki & Matt Jensen




Four March Sundays
Family-friendly music series presents local & regional talent

02/20/14
By Michael Witthaus music@hippopress.com



 A need to experience great music somewhere other than a late-night barroom prompted Eric Reingold to start an afternoon music series in Concord. It starts March 2 in the Concord City Auditorium lobby. 

“I’m at the age where my friends are starting to have kids, and I don’t see them out very often,” Reingold said. “It’s great to have this venue where it happens in the afternoon and everyone can come.”
This Merrimack Music Series offers an eclectic array of talent in an all-ages setting. It kicks off Sunday, March 2, with the jazz-tinged duo of Kenny Weiland and Brad Myrick, followed by Diamond Joe, an Americana act that’s something of a local institution. 
“Andy Laliotis has been on the scene so long,” Reingold said. “Last year I would have loved to have him on but it’s good to include him this year.”
The second Sunday features two Concord singer-songwriters. Ellen Theresa Fagan plays the early set, combining skillful guitar playing with a high lonesome sound. Lauren Hurley closes; intelligent and intense, raw and raucous, she’s a fast-rising star on the local scene. 
“She’s one of my favorite local artists,” Reingold said. “I used to play with her a bit. She’s just a cool person; her lyrics are great. I love everything she’s doing.”
Hurley is one of many handpicked performers Reingold is excited to see. 
“Every performer brings something different. I’m very interested in Ian Ethan Case; a single guy on a double-necked guitar is very unique. But I’m just looking forward to being there every Sunday.” 
Case performs with Mica-Sev Project on March 16.
Another performer high on Reingold’s list is fiddler Jordan Tirrell-Wysocki, who closes out the series on March 23. 
“With a fiddle you don’t think that he could be as versatile, but I was in a funk band with him [Jamantics, 2009-2010] and he was right there.”
Performances happen in the auditorium’s lobby area. Someday, the 700-seat main room might be used, “but we need an act that can fill it,” said Reingold “Right now, 100 people is about what can be expected for the shows, though towards the end of last year, we got some standing-room crowds.” 
The energy of a vibrant music community has helped the festival grow beyond the locals-only affair of last year. A surfeit of original performers and several receptive venues are important elements. 
“There are a lot of factors that make Concord good for music,” said Reingold. “One is the age of people around here, having a lot of young people interested in music; a lot of business are too. There really is a lot of talent here and a lot of goodwill.”
This supportive environment makes performers much more willing to commit time and a tank of gas, Reingold said. 
“People are willing to come up from Portsmouth or Boston to play a little venue in Concord.”
Reingold currently plays guitar with the Shardz, and he’s a businessman who runs Endicott Furniture, a Main Street fixture for nearly a century. 
“It’s my family business; my great-grandfather started in in 1925,” Reingold said. “I’m happy and honored to have the background of being a local business owner.”
The support provided by merchants is vital. 
“There are a lot of old businesses here, and I find that the ones I’m friends with are the ones that help support the scene,” he said. “I find that my role as a business owner really helps when I ask for donations or support. I’m not just a member of the band. That’s not a point of view everyone has.”
 
As seen in the February 20, 2014 issue of the Hippo.





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