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Jun 22, 2018







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Courtesy of Michael Sterling Photography.




Participating restaurants 

Anju
Black Birch
Black Trumpet
Embers Bakery
Franklin Oyster House
Joinery
Louie’s
Martingale Wharf
Moxy
Otis Restaurant
The Rosa 
Tinos Greek Kitchen
Throwback Brewery 
Vida Cantina
When Pigs Fly Pizzeria
 
Educational booths 
Bedrock Gardens
Chefs Collaborative
New England Fishmongers 
Our Water Our Choice
Planet Rangers 
Seacoast Eat Local
Seacoast Local
Seacoast Permaculture
Seed Library Initiative
Southeast Land Trust of NH
Strawbery Banke Museum
 
Sixth annual Farm-A-Q
Where: Barth Family and Dog Rose Farm, 41 Birch Hill Road, Lee
When: Sunday, June 25, from noon to 4 p.m. 
Cost: $30 for adults, $25 for Slow Food members, $15 for youth ages 13 through 20, $5 for children ages 3 through 12, and free for children under age 3 
Visit: slowfoodseacoast.com/sixth-annual-farmaq-june-25




From farm to barbecue
Picnic dinner features local heirloom, heritage foods

06/22/17
By Angie Sykeny asykeny@hippopress.com



 Eating farm-to-table doesn’t have to be reserved for formal dinners. That’s why Slow Food Seacoast and the Heirloom Harvest Project started the Farm-A-Q, a picnic-style event held on a farm, highlighting heirloom and heritage foods grown and raised on local farms and prepared by local chefs. 

The sixth annual Farm-A-Q will take place on Sunday, June 25, at Barth Family and Dog Rose Farm in Lee and will feature meals from more than a dozen Seacoast-area restaurants as well as a variety of tastings, demonstrations and workshops.  
“We wanted to make farm-to-table and heirloom ingredients more inclusive and give people access to those foods for a lot less money [than a formal dinner],” said Evan Mallett, chef and co-owner of Portsmouth restaurant Black Trumpet and co-founder of the Heirloom Harvest Project. “We want people to no longer think of farm-to-table as a unique thing, but as a way of life, and as the standard, not the exception.” 
Chefs from participating restaurants will each prepare a meal, with ingredients and dishes such as fermented garlic chives, carrot pibil, pickled garden chard stems, turnips and radishes, heirloom bean salad, farm goat pastrami, roasted hog, chashu pork and more.  
The event has a different theme each year; this year’s theme is education, which will be played out in a number of demonstrations and workshops put on by the participating restaurants and local food-related organizations. Those will include things like a talk and tasting of sourdough starter used for flatbread pizza, plus a make-your-own pizza workshop for kids; a tasting and demonstration of pickling techniques; a wild edible walk around the farm; a talk on heirloom seed saving; a fish filet demonstration; a tour of the hosting farm’s vegetable operation and greenhouses; a strawberry shortcake workshop for kids and more. 
Additionally, there will be tables with information on various local food initiatives and organizations, and people will have the chance to connect with some local farmers and talk with them about their CSA programs and the work they are doing. 
“Education is a big part of our mission and we want to make sure that educational component is at the forefront of the event,” Mallett said. “It’s super-exciting to be bringing people this information that we [chefs] all use in our [food] buying habits and in our restaurants.” 
The Heirloom Harvest Project will also host the Barn Dinner, a more formal event highlighting local heirloom and heritage foods, on Sept. 25 at Meadow’s Mirth Farm in Stratham. 





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