The Hippo

HOME| ADVERTISING| CONTACT US|

 
Nov 15, 2018







NEWS & FEATURES

POLITICAL

FOOD & DRINK

ARTS

MUSIC & NIGHTLIFE

POP CULTURE



BEST OF
CLASSIFIEDS
ADVERTISING
CONTACT US
PAST ISSUES
ABOUT US
MOBILE UPDATES
LIST MY CALENDAR ITEM


 St. Philip Orthodox Christian Church Greek Food Festival

When: Friday, May 18, and Saturday, May 19, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Where: 500 W. Hollis St., Nashua
Cost: Free admission and parking; foods are priced per item and cash and credit cards are accepted (additional parking is available at Stellos Stadium at 7 Stadium Drive, with free shuttle buses to and from the church)
Visit: stphilipnh.org/events/festival




Going Greek
St. Philip Greek Food Festival returns to Nashua

05/17/18



 By Matt Ingersoll

mingersoll@hippopress.com
 
More than 1,500 gyros, 170 pans of spanakopita, 95 pans of pastichio and 1,600 pounds of marinated lamb will be among the many items you can expect at the annual Greek Food Festival at St. Philip Orthodox Christian Church in Nashua, returning on Friday, May 18, and Saturday, May 19.
The two-day festival, which has been held for more than three decades, has grown to feed between 6,000 and 8,000 people, according to Father Alex Chetsas of the church. 
In addition to the food, the festival also features local vendor stations, live music and dancing.
“It’s kind of on the more homey side of things. A lot of the items you will see … are made from family recipes the church members have that go back literally hundreds of years,” Chetsas said. “We’ve been baking and cooking every weekend pretty much since the new year.”
Foods are available for purchase either a la carte or as meals that include a main dish and multiple sides and desserts. Some of the more popular items, according to Chetsas, are dolmathes (stuffed grape leaves), spanakopita (spinach pie) and pastichio (a pasta dish with cheese and meat, similar to lasagna). You can also order marinated lamb, roasted chicken, and gyros with a tzatziki sauce.
While those are prepared in advance, the dessert pastries are often made in the final weeks leading up to the festival. Baklava is one of the most popular dessert options each year, Chetsas said, and you can upgrade it to baklava sundaes, with vanilla ice cream and other toppings.
Other desserts include galaktoboureko (a Greek custard pie, similar to an Indian pudding), and kourambiethes (powdered sugar cookies).
“[Kourambiethes] are basically like Greek buttered cookies that go great with a cup of tea or coffee,” Chetsas said.
The festival will feature a small selection of non-Greek food items as well, like chocolate-covered strawberries, cookies, hot dogs and more, according to Chetsas.
There are tents where you can sit and enjoy your meal, or you can get it to go.
Ta Pethia, a Greek-American dance band that has played at past festivals, will perform on both days. Several vendor stations will be set up as well.
“We usually have everything from nice specialty olive oils imported from Greece, to jewelry and some other nice goodies, so it’s great if you’re looking for little gifts for somebody,” Chetsas said. 
 





®2018 Hippo Press. site by wedu