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Glendi Greek food festival at St. George Greek Orthodox Cathedral in Manchester. Courtesy photo.




Glendi 

Where: St. George Greek Orthodox Cathedral, 650 Hanover St., Manchester
When: Friday, Sept. 16, and Saturday, Sept. 17, from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m., with food service until 9 p.m., and Sunday, Sept. 18, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. 
Cost: Free admission. Food priced per item. 
Visit: saintgeorgeglendi.com




Good times at Glendi
Greek food festival returns to Manchester

09/15/16
By Angie Sykeny asykeny@hippopress.com



 Greek or not, chances are you’ll find something you like among the enormous spread of stuffed grape leaves, lamb, baklava and other Greek specialties that will be available at the annual three-day food festival known as Glendi.

“People, especially non-Greeks, really like to eat our food,” Cathy Moufarge, festival co-chairman, said. “They’re willing to stand in lines for hours for it. For us, it’s not a big deal because it’s a staple in our households, but we can understand why everyone likes it. Something about the Greek flavors with the seasonings and the way the meats are marinated just tastes delicious.” 
Glendi, which means “good times” in Greek, will be held at the Saint George Greek Orthodox Cathedral in Manchester from Friday, Sept. 16, through Sunday, Sept. 18. 
The menu includes traditional entrees like the popular pastitsio (Greek lasagna), stuffed peppers, dolmades (stuffed grape leaves), Greek meatballs, gyros, loukaniko (Greek sausage), barbecued lamb and baked lamb shank. 
“A lot of people come just for the lamb shanks,” Moufarge said. “Everyone who likes lamb goes crazy for them.” 
This year’s menu also features a new dish called chicken souvlaki, which is seasoned chicken topped with lettuce, red onion and tzatziki sauce, wrapped in pita bread. 
There are as many kinds of pastries offered as there are entrees, including spanakopita (layers of phyllo dough with spinach and cheese filling) which is always a favorite, baklava, galatoboureko (layers of filo dough with Greek custard) and a variety of cookies, but the most anticipated pastry, Moufarge said, are the loukoumades — freshly made fried dough puffs soaked in syrup and sprinkled with cinnamon and powdered sugar. 
“The loukoumades draw their own line which runs the length of the church hall. It’s ridiculous how many people wait for those,” she said, “but those are definitely one of the things people come for because they are out of this world.” 
Other sweet treats include rice pudding, baklava ice cream and baklava sundaes and frappes, which Moufarge said are “to die for.” There will also be specialty drinks like Greek coffee, beer and wine. 
Cooking operations for Glendi begin as early as June, and food is stored in big walk-in freezers until the week of the festival. Most of the recipes used are modified versions of old family recipes from the church’s members.
“Of course, it’s difficult when you have to use a recipe for an at-home normal-sized portion of something and make it work for thousands of people,” Moufarge said. “It takes some practice, but we finally have it down to a science and have used these recipes for a while.” 
In addition to the food, Glendi will highlight other aspects of Greek culture with live music and dancing, including a Greek dance troupe that will showcase traditional Greek clothing, and a small market with Greek imported goods and crafts like jewelry, crocheted items and more. There will also be blast inflatables and activities for kids, a penny raffle, church tours and recipe books for sale.





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