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Grape News
The low-down on N.H.’s grapes, plus wine news

07/24/14
By Stefanie Phillips food@hippopress.com



 New Hampshire may not seem like a likely place to grow grapes, but winemakers here have figured out how to make it work (or use local fruit and skip the grapes altogether). Here are some common grapes being grown right here in the Granite State that you may see when you visit one of the state’s many wineries. 

 
Marechal Foch
This grape is a French-American hybrid that is hardy enough to withstand cold New England winters. Wines from this grape can vary slightly, but it typically produces a medium-bodied red with some tannin, similar to a French Burgundy. This wine can be sweet or slightly dry; ask the winemaker about his or her version.
Where to find it: Sweet Baby Vineyard in East Kingston; Jewell Towne in South Hampton; Flag Hill Winery in Lee; Haunting Whisper Vineyards in Danbury
 
Leon Millot
Leon Millot, also French, is a relative of Marechal Foch and typically produces a medium-bodied red wine. Sometimes, it can have a slight effervescence. 
Where to find it: Sweet Baby Vineyard (Callum’s Red); Jewell Towne Vineyards 
 
Aurore
Aurore is another French hybrid that produces a crisp and refreshing white reminiscent of  pinot grigio. Typically there are fruit notes of apple or citrus, some acidity and a fairly smooth finish.
Where to find it: Jewell Towne
 
Cayuga
This grape was developed at Cornell University as a hybrid between riesling and Seyval Blanc. Similar to Aurore, it typically produces a dry and crisp white. 
Where to find it: Haunting Whisper Vineyard; Flag Hill Winery 
 
Vignoles
Vignoles is a French-American hybrid that produces a sweeter white wine. 
Where to find it: Flag Hill Winery; Haunting Whisper Vineyards 
 
Fruit Wines & Others
Sure, grapes are fruit, but this includes a wide array of other fruits like apples, cranberries, blueberries, jalapenos and more. Let’s also not forget about honey, which makes mead.
Where to find it: Most New Hampshire wineries (but not all) offer grape wines but a fruit wine or mead as well
 
NH Wine News
• Sweet Baby Vineyard in East Kingston took home several medals in the Eastern States Wine Expo, held earlier this year. Their Blueberry, Callum’s Red, Raspberry and Apple-Cranberry wines took home silver, while their Marechal Foch, Apple and Strawberry wines took home bronze. Congrats to Sweet Baby on this recognition.
• Sweet Baby’s neighbor winery, Jewell Towne Vineyards in South Hampton, also took home some medals at the Eastern States Wine Expo. They were recognized as the best New Hampshire wine from locally grown grapes. Their 2013 estate grown wines Aurore, Cayuga, Petit Amis, Valvin Muscat, Port and Chardonnay won silver medals, while their Marechal Foch, Leon Millot, Landot Noir and Alden took bronze. According to the winery’s Facebook page, they have won the best New Hampshire wine at the Eastern States Wine Expo six times during the past nine years. 
• Hermit Woods Winery, now in its new location on Main Street in Meredith, has a lot to celebrate these days. Its Petite Blue Reserve wine was recently featured on the Today Show with Kathie Lee and Hoda, who did a segment with Ray Isle, executive wine editor of Food and Wine magazine. Both hosts said they liked the wine and were surprised that it was made from fruit. Hermit Woods also earned the title of Editor’s Pick for Best Fruit Wine in New Hampshire from New Hampshire Magazine. 
• The guys over at Coffin Cellars in Webster have been hard at work on their new tasting room. They are refurbishing an existing building on their property by updating the interior and exterior. Recent pictures look great and I can’t wait to visit and check it out. They also added three new tanks to their winery. 
 
As seen in the July 24, 2014 issue of the Hippo.





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