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Dinner with the RDs — Mediterranean Meals

When: Wednesday, Oct. 28, from 6 to 8 p.m.
Where: Carl Amelia Room, St. Joseph Hospital, 172 Kinsley St., Nashua
Cost: $10 fee includes dinner, discussion and Q&A with the experts
Visit: sjhnh.org




Healthy lifestyles
St. Joseph’s dietitians discuss Mediterranean cuisine

10/22/15
By Allie Ginwala aginwala@hippopress.com



For clinical dietitian Marilou Bucciano, eating lots of fresh produce, whole grains, fish and olive oil shouldn’t be seen as a diet.

“Whereas a diet usually has a start date and an end date and maybe one specific goal, a Mediterranean diet or lifestyle incorporates healthy eating, not avoiding any food groups, and encompasses getting exercise and eating meals with other people and enjoying healthy food,” she said in a phone interview. 
Along with dietitians Emily Palen and Rebekah Donelan, Bucciano will lead Dinner with the RDs — Mediterranean Meals on Wednesday, Oct. 28, part of the Dinner with the Docs educational fall class series at St. Joseph’s Hospital.
Bucciano leads classes each year focused on meals and exercise. At a talk last year about Mediterranean cuisine, she said, the people that came out were mostly in their 50s to 70s, but she would love to see a wider demographic this time around.
“I would love to see younger people go to these talks, because the sooner you start having a healthy lifestyle the chances of you having a lot of these negative health results is [diminished],” she said.
Gathering together in the Carl Amelia Room at St. Joseph Hospital, guests will enjoy a colorful and healthy meal prepared by hospital Executive Chef David Bressler that follows the Mediterranean diet pyramid.
“The way the Mediterranean diet pyramid works … on the widest bar on the bottom is being physically active and enjoying meals with family and friends,” Bucciano said. 
The next bar up covers produce, nuts, grains, legumes and olive oil, followed by seafood, then dairy, eggs and poultry, with meat and sweets in the top of the pyramid.
“So the meal at the event will be made up of parts of these items, a little bit of each of them from the pyramid,” she said.
Expect buffet-style dishes of grilled salmon with mango salsa and avocado, bulgur and pine nut crusted grilled chicken, farro pilaf, whole-grain baguettes with olive oil, fall  fruits and veggies and tawny port poached pears with almonds for dessert.
After everyone has had a chance to enjoy the food spread, the dietitians will take turns talking about the origin of Mediterranean meals, the types of food that are involved, the health benefits of eating produce rich in antioxidants, suggestions for recipes and simple ways to incorporate the foods into daily life.
“It’s more about teaching people to shop from the perimeters of the supermarket where the fresh fruits and vegetables are, where the fish is, the lean cuts of meat and chicken,” Bucciano said. “[It’s] not big fancy meals where you need to plan all day, just simple quick ways to get a quick nutritious meal, and it doesn’t come out of a box.”





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