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Nov 19, 2018







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Marcia Wilson and her husband Mark have their “Eyes on Owls.” Courtesy photo.




Eyes on Owls

Where: PSNH Five Rivers Auditorium, 780 Commercial St., Manchester
When: Saturday, Nov. 1, from 11 a.m. to 12:15 p.m., and 1 to 2:15 p.m.
Cost: $10 per person, $25 per family. Advance registration with payment is required.
Call: 626-3474
Visit: amsokeagfishways.org

 





Hoot-enanny
Amoskeag Fishways showcases wise side of nature

10/30/14



Amoskeag Fishways will explore the habitats and behavior of the wisest creatures in nature during its annual Eyes on Owls event on Saturday, Nov. 1.

Helen Dalbeck, executive director of Amoskeag Fishways, said that the learning center welcomes back Mark and Marcia Wilson, naturalists from Dunstable, Mass., who have been hosting the program for over 10 years in New Hampshire. The Wilsons will bring several species — in the past they have brought eastern screech owls, barred owls, Northern saw-whet owls, great-horned owls and Eurasian owls, all native to New Hampshire except the latter.
For this particular session, the Wilsons will also be bringing a snowy owl. Marcia Wilson said that the session prefaces the snowy owls’ migrating season.
“The snowy owls start migrating south from the Arctic,” Wilson said in a recent phone interview. “This is really an exciting time for birders. Just into November is when the snowys should start showing up.”
The Wilsons will start off the session with a slideshow presentation of some of the rehabilitation work that they’ve done with the owls and a condensed natural history of the birds they work with.
Wilson said that she and her husband provide hooting lessons for people to properly identify what owls might be living nearby.
“[The hoots] are all wacky,” she said. “The fun thing is not only identifying what type of owl makes the sound, but if people can echo the sound as best as they can, sometimes [the owls] will answer you. Interacting with wildlife is fun once you get to know what’s around you.”
The Wilsons also talk about the characteristics of the owls’ environment so that participants can search for clues to where the owls live. The presentation includes field marks, signs and naturalist’s skills that you can use to find wild owls without disturbing them.
Wilson said seeing the owls up close gives people a different understanding of the birds. While birders can explore wooded areas around New Hampshire in search of these creatures, usually they can only study the owls from afar. 
“You get to see a little more interaction of the birds’ natural behavior, on top of the fact that you get to see the very fine marks on their feathers, feather patterns, stuff that you couldn’t see from a distance,” said Wilson. “When they stare at you up close, it’s really quite something. Sometimes they give you a look like they’re really looking into your soul.” 
 
As seen in the October 30, 2014 issue of the Hippo.





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