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Courtesy photo.




Herrmann’s Royal Lipizzan Stallions

When: Friday, Sept. 2, 7 p.m.; Saturday, Sept. 3, 3 p.m.; Sunday, Sept. 4, 5 p.m.; and Monday, Sept. 5, 3 p.m.
Where: UpReach Therapeutic Equestrian Center, 153 Paige Hill Road, Goffstown
Cost: $25 for adults, $20 for kids ages 6 through 12
Visit: hlipizzans.com or upreachtrc.org




Horses with history
Lipizzan stallion shows to benefit UpReach

09/01/16
By Matt Ingersoll listings@hippopress.com



 Watch “the ballet dancers of the horse world” when Herrmann’s Lipizzan Stallions stop in Goffstown during Labor Day weekend as part of their two-month tour.

The stallions will perform their dance-like Airs Above the Ground techniques during four 90-minute shows at UpReach Therapeutic Equestrian Center from Friday, Sept. 2, through Monday, Sept. 5.
“These horses were originally kept behind closed doors for royalty and bred for war,” said Gabriella Herrmann, owner of Herrmann’s Lipizzan Stallions farm in Florida, “so only the kings, princes and high-ranking officers were allowed to sit on them. They actually stopped using the [Airs Above the Ground] maneuvers when gunpowder started to be used, so it’s considered ... a lost art.”
Among the special methods of dressage the horses will be performing will include the “levade,” in which the horse raises its two front legs to maintain a standstill position at a 45-degree angle. Other maneuvers will be the “courbette,” where the horse performs several jumps on its hind legs off the ground, and the “capriole,” where it strikes with its hind legs after leaping in the air from all four feet.
Herrmann said all breeds of horses are capable of performing these types of maneuvers, but the Lipizzan Stallions are easier to train because they have a much heavier bone structure in their feet.
It’s little factoids like this that make these shows more than just an artistic performance, Herrmann said — there’s a history lesson, too.
“[We] explain a lot of history, and the training and maneuvering is explained too, so it’s very educational,” she said.
About 12 of the stallions tour at one time. Herrmann said they used to visit venues small and large all over the United States and parts of Canada. But in recent years, they have focused on much smaller venues — it gives people a chance to see them up close, and it’s a little easier on the horses. 
“A generation of seniors who come to our shows know the history of [the stallions] coming to the U.S., and we’ve got families that now come and bring their children when they themselves came as kids,” Herrmann said. “And of course those in the horse community appreciate the shows because they know the time it takes to train these horses.”
Herrmann said several members of her family as well as hired apprentices come to the farm and to the shows during the tour. This will be their first time visiting UpReach, but they have performed shows at a few other therapeutic centers in the past.
All proceeds from ticket sales at each of the four shows will benefit all of the offerings at UpReach, according to program director Kristen McGraw, which include therapeutic horseback riding, a therapeutic carriage driving program, equine-facilitated mental health and assisted learning programs, and several other partnerships. 
“It’s a great cause and my hand really goes out to those folks,” Herrmann said, “because I know how much work, effort and patience goes into doing this. … It’s a treat because the horses love the audiences, and the [money] they are raising for the Center is definitely another great aspect.” 





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