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Jan 21, 2018







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Pumpkin soup

From the kitchen of chef Peter Agostinelli
 
1 Long Island cheese pumpkin, split in half and seeds removed
1 small Spanish onion, diced
5 garlic cloves, chopped
2 fresh bay leaves
1 tablespoon Madras curry powder
1 quart apple cider
1 pint 40-percent heavy cream
Vegetable stock (as needed)
Olive oil for seasoning
Salt and black pepper for seasoning
 
Wash the pumpkin seeds and toss in sea salt and olive oil. Roast at 325 degrees for approximately 25 minutes, stirring every 5 minutes. Rub the inside of the pumpkin with olive oil, salt and black pepper. Roast cut-side down until flesh is very tender. After pumpkin is cooked, remove skin and discard. In a large stock pot, sauté onions and garlic until tender. Add curry powder and cook, stirring constantly for five minutes to toast curry. Add pumpkin, bay leaves, and cider. Add enough vegetable stock to cover the pumpkin by one-inch. Simmer the mixture for 45 minutes, then add cream. Puree soup in a blender and season with salt and pepper. Serve with toasted pumpkin seeds.
 




In the Kitchen with Peter Agostinelli


09/04/14



Peter Agostinelli joined the staff at the Bedford Village Inn (2 Olde Bedford Way, Bedford, 472-2001, bedfordvillageinn.com) as the executive chef this summer, but this isn’t his first time at the four-diamond restaurant and inn. Agostinelli previously worked at the Bedford Village Inn from 2004 to 2010. He attended Newbury College, where he graduated with his culinary arts degree in 1998 and has worked with Chef Todd English’s Olive Group, at the Bedford Village Inn and Exeter Inn. Although he describes his culinary style as eclectic and a global infusion of technique and flavor, his roots are in Italian-style cooking.
 
What is your must-have kitchen item?
Honestly, a must-have — salt.
 
What would you choose for your last meal?
Probably sushi. Or my mom’s pork chop and vinegar pepper dish. Either one of those two.
 
Favorite restaurant besides your own?
There’s this little Vietnamese noodle shop right near my house in Lowell, Pho Da Lat. It’s just these clean beautiful Vietnamese noodle soups, fresh spring rolls. Nothing special about it, just everything’s done right everytime you go in.
 
What celebrity would you like to see eating at your restaurant?
I’ve never really thought about that. I’m a pretty big Red Sox fan, so it would be pretty cool to see Dustin Pedroia or David Ortiz up here. I don’t really get star struck very often. I want to treat everybody like a celebrity, I guess.
What is the biggest food trend in New Hampshire right now?
It’s hard for me to answer that New Hampshire part, but I’d say food trucks. I don’t know what the food truck scene looks like in the Manchester area, but I feel like that’s turning into the next big thing right now.
 
What’s your favorite meal to cook at home?
[It] would probably be on like, a fall Sunday afternoon, a big pot of soup, like minestrone or something like that. About once a month we’ll make Sunday gravy.
 
What is your favorite dish on your restaurant’s menu?
We just changed all the menus so I would say my favorite dish right now, we are doing this really cool chicken and waffle dish right now in the Tavern. It’s buttermilk-fat fried chicken, with a smoked bacon fat waffle, espresso bourbon red-eye gravy, with mustard greens and a sunnyside-up egg. It’s pretty killer.
Emelia Attridge 





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