The Hippo

HOME| ADVERTISING| CONTACT US|

 
Jul 17, 2018







NEWS & FEATURES

POLITICAL

FOOD & DRINK

ARTS

MUSIC & NIGHTLIFE

POP CULTURE



BEST OF
CLASSIFIEDS
ADVERTISING
CONTACT US
PAST ISSUES
ABOUT US
MOBILE UPDATES
LIST MY CALENDAR ITEM


Jelly Roll Morton, Dr. Jazz (DigiMusic Records)




Max Bouratoglou, Idle Intuition (Sony/Red)

Upon finding out that this kid’s only 16, yeah, I felt a little rickrolled by his voice, which is basically Huey Lewis without the club baggage. He’s from Brooklyn, where he was mentored by his mom’s friend Ken Stringfellow, he of the Posies, Big Star, R.E.M. and anyone else with a checkbook, so the foundation is definitely there, and his songs are OK if not astonishingly brilliant. But what do you expect from a kid who wrote leadoff track “Contagious” last summer while he was at camp (repeat: at camp)? Who knows, maybe he grows up to become the next Stringfellow, producing and sidemanning and whatnot, but for now there are signs this could all work out, and at least he won’t be a Bieber, with Huey Lewis oatmeal like “Contagious” and an obvious nod to Coldplay on “Strangers.” Of course, for all I know I’ve been had, and this was a bunch of cuts by The News that never made it to vinyl. First time for everything, you know? A- — Eric W. Saeger




Jelly Roll Morton, Dr. Jazz (DigiMusic Records)
CD Reviews: July 27, 2017

07/27/17
By Eric Saeger news@hippopress.com



Jelly Roll Morton, Dr. Jazz (DigiMusic Records)

Digital release of one of the master’s early hits, the title track being more an example of Morton’s early New Orleans jazz freestyle methodology than the more complex things that came later, when he began feeling more comfortable as an actual composer of the stuff. Recorded with his Red Hot Peppers in 1926, that song is a bouncing, joyful cacophony that Dixieland bands still play today, with soloists all going off at once over a nominal rhythm. It’s joined by 20 other tracks that play to Morton’s bigger strengths, such as 1925’s “Black Bottom Stomp,” with the same crew getting downright classical in complexity while still maintaining a regular-joe accessibility. I’ve heard slightly better recordings of Morton, some of them astonishingly clear; these tunes haven’t been gussied up that much, but the innovation, of course, is crystal clear. Morton was an early (if not the first) inventor of jazz itself, writing blueprints that made the jobs of soloists infinitely more fun. Any exposure to the guy is worth your time. A — Eric W. Saeger





®2018 Hippo Press. site by wedu