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Oct 23, 2018







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Jethro Tull, Heavy Horses [New Shoes Edition] (Parlophone Records)




Drishti Beats, Paradise High (self-released)

I got a ration of guff once during an interview on a local yoga-focused radio show, when a caller took umbrage with my criticism of “fashion yogis,” you know the type, yoga’s answer to weightlifting bros who refuse to acknowledge or help newbies who obviously need it. And that was 10 years ago, when I first started teaching gentle Kripalu classes and had to fake a few ashtanga poses — I could sense the smirks of the jocks even back then. I mention all this because this band of Virginia beatmakers has incorporated their smooth, surprisingly good blend of EDM into their own yoga teacher trainings; whether it’ll catch on is a big question, but at this point, with the practice being increasingly more about body than mind in America, it isn’t a dumb idea. The songs are more deep-house than EDM, leading off with Rihanna and Usher soundalikes cold-chilling over a bubble-pop line that Tricky might have thrown together as a slow-cooker during the mid-Aughts. That tune has sax in it, which isn’t welcome, but “Santoor Chop” fares much better, with tabla and a sitar sample emulating a harp and thankfully no pop elements. The diva stuff returns in “Defeat Gravity” but it’s less annoying; “Vitality” delivers primal drumming and cogent EDM. A- — Eric W. Saeger




Jethro Tull, Heavy Horses [New Shoes Edition] (Parlophone Records)
CD Reviews: 1/18/2018

01/18/18
By Eric Saeger news@hippopress.com



Jethro Tull, Heavy Horses [New Shoes Edition] (Parlophone Records)

If you’re a Boomer who really wants to feel old, this reissue’s press release reminds us that it’s been 40 years since this album was released and — get this — 50 since Tull first appeared on the scene. Sad, I know, but not for me so much; I was never a Tull fanatic and have blown off something like three opportunities to see what’s left of them, which has usually meant singer Ian Anderson’s dropping in at Tupelo Music Hall, if I recall correctly. 50 bucks will get you this set, which features three CDs and two DVDs that mark this “New Shows” edition. That only means that there are seven of nine bonus tracks that were previously unreleased, and live tracks were mixed to surround-sound. Released after the Songs From the Wood, which dwarfed its success, this was nowhere near their biggest album, written when Anderson was still nostalgic about running around the English suburbs as a boy, but maybe not as inspired. But that’s debatable, of course, especially for fans, and yes, there’s a 96-page booklet for full immersion. A — Eric W. Saeger 





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