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Nov 18, 2018







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Ken Fowser, Don’t Look Down (Posi-Tone Records)




Tashaki Miyaki, The Dream (Metropolis Records)

Nothing overly subtle about the lyrical content from the Los Angeles duo: “All the boys will want me, and everyone will like me” sings Paige Stark on “Girls on TV,” which otherwise brings the best part of Raveonettes and super-glues it to Wilco. Singer and drummer Stark is the typical sexually ambivalent shoegaze type, impossible to fathom but equally impossible to resist, and her Jack White counterpart Luke Paquin, while not completely obsessed with Nels Cline loopback techniques, nevertheless blankets these floaty, jangly ditties with all the right sorts of phase-shifted noise, particularly on “Out of My Head,” in which Stark’s depressed, Patsy Cline-redolent moping seems like it had always been half-cybernetic. “Cool Runnings” has a slight flavor of — how would you say this — Hawaiian twee, a bizarre blending of ukulele-emulated Belle and Sebastian and Glasvegas. It’s a weird trip but enjoyable, like Black Rebel Motorcycle Club with a muzzle.
— Eric W. Saeger




Ken Fowser, Don’t Look Down (Posi-Tone Records)
CD Reviews: March 1, 2018

03/01/18
By Eric Saeger news@hippopress.com



Ken Fowser, Don’t Look Down (Posi-Tone Records)

Fresh from New York City comes this new set of busy, lively originals from the jazz saxman, whose Friday night shows at the Roxy’s Django lounge appear to have come to an end despite their popularity. His harmonic concepts, so the one-sheet says, are treated in a contemporary manner, which is to say that it’s heavy on the lounge, not too out-there, but like I said, it’s busy. The melodies are bold-print if intricate, a rare thing in most jazz albums not from the city. In one example of their deftness with chill, the band flirts with bossa nova in “You’re Better Than That,” giving breezy, endlessly competent trumpeter Josh Bruneau a good amount of stretching space. Opener “Maker’s Marc” is a standout, a whiz-bang bit of modern-bop rubber-burning, while “Fall Back” gives the Yellowjackets a run for their money. Lots of charisma throughout, really a great one. A+ — Eric W. Saeger





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