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Apr 19, 2018







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Lana Del Rey, Lust for Life (Interscope Records)




 Lisa Said, Estranged (Tall Short Records)

The backstory of this EP is rooted in Said’s childhood, growing up in an Egyptian immigrant family in rural Tennessee, a real-life sitcom situation that might be untenable today, what with — oh, you know the deal. Except for the whirling zydeco of “Travelling Minus Zero,” her last record, No Turn Left Behind, was basically a tryout for a Sheryl Crow cover band, but this time out, focused on a desire to drop a quick EP with passion pegged and purposely little planning — she’s found her inner Natalie Merchant, and a bit of an inner Chrissie Hynde while she’s at it. “Some Dudes,” the opener, unveils Said’s fetish for early booze-blues Rolling Stones with some rough-and-tumble slide-guitar moves that are so nasty you half-expect Kim Deal to sing a bar or two; the Chrissie side rears its head on “Regular Guy”; “Peel the Moon” evokes solo Natalie. Straightforward stuff throughout, bolstered by a hard-wired ability to draw out her notes until they work. B — Eric W. Saeger




Lana Del Rey, Lust for Life (Interscope Records)
CD Reviews: 8/3/17

08/03/17
By Eric Saeger news@hippopress.com



 Lana Del Rey, Lust for Life (Interscope Records)

The photogenic singer’s fifth album is a haunting backward step to her 2012 Born to Die debut, but with a bit more hip-hop in its veins. If you’re not familiar with her, imagine a waifish Adele after a quarter-fifth of vodka, the mourning longing tones impelled by a lot of bedroom-ready echo, this kind of thing. If I have to pick one quibble, it’s with the predictability of the contents, although the Phil Spector girl group ballad “Love” emulates The Crystals after an all-night bender quite admirably, proffering a nice unhealthy amount of Raveonettes-level beach-angst, but that’s nothing compared to the “Take off your clothes” refrain swimming through the title track’s interplay with The Weeknd, whose falsetto is in full get-it-on mode. The amniotic, subatomic incidental percussion on the absolutely drugged-sounding “Cherry” is pretty irresistible, but I wasn’t wildly impressed with the perfunctory “Beautiful People Beautiful Problems,” which comes off like something that was hastily cobbled together in order to take advantage of Stevie Nicks showing up for a one-off. That said, there’s nothing truly awful here. B+ — Eric W. Saeger





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