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Krispy Kreme doughnut shop made of Legos at last year’s BrickFair. Courtesy photo.




BrickFair

Where: Radisson Hotel, 700 Elm St., Manchester
When: Saturday, May 10, and Sunday, May 11, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
Cost: $9 admission, 
parking is $10
Contact: 625-1000
Visit: brickfair.com, nelug.org




Lego land
BrickFair comes to Radisson

05/08/14



 The BrickFair is for all ages, but in Todd Webb’s eyes, it is most definitely a place for adults who never grew up. 

“It’s for geeks like me that never put away the Legos,” Webb said. 
Webb is a member of Adult Fans of Lego, a national group of Lego lovers that organizes BrickFairs like the one coming to Manchester at the Radisson Hotel on May 10 and May 11. 
“When the public walks in, they’re going to see Lego displays built. There will be a few games going on, like bingo and guess the number of Legos in the jar. There will be a photo booth there as well,” said Webb, who helped organize the Manchester event. “It’s a celebration of all things Legos.”
Webb said the best part of the show for members of Adult Fans of Lego is showing off the displays they built. 
“The public is going to gravitate to anything that has moving parts. The train layout will get a lot of attention,” he said. 
There are also displays that defy gravity, Webb said, and one that’s 12 feet tall.
“My favorite things to build are displays that are easy to transport,” Webb said.
Last year he made a Lego display inside a Ferrero Rocher chocolate box and this year plans to do the same thing inside a Whitman’s Sampler heart-shaped chocolate box, where he will use Legos to imitate chocolate. 
While Webb’s displays are on the easier side because he has to fly in from Maryland, those participating locally will spend up to two days making Lego creations. 
“They’ll have a whole setup with streets, buildings, light poles and people,” he said. 
Webb said there are LUGs, or Lego user groups, across the country that meet up and hang out while building with Legos. 
NELUG, New England Lego User Group, will be at the fair in Manchester.
“It’s definitely social. I’ve met a lot of amazing people, and we share ideas and discover new ways to build,” said Tom Atkinson, an executive board member of NELUG.
Atkinson said his forte is building the great ball contraption. 
“Basically it’s a setup of modules that allow Lego soccer balls to be passed around,” he said, noting that it can’t adequately be described and should be seen in person. 
Aside from creative displays, there will be about a dozen vendors at the BrickFair.
“Products range from selling things like T-shirts to Lego-building kits — used or new — and even jewelry. The jewelry is pretty cool. They have things like Lego earrings and Lego necklaces,” Webb said. 
Webb said that attending the fair will open up a world of possibilities for children and families. 
“It’ll inspire your kids to see what they can create. You never throw Legos away, and you’ll use them forever. It’s an affordable afternoon out, and it’s active, hands-on and engaging,” he said. 
Webb hopes the fair will encourage kids to keep building and help adults find their inner child.  
“My favorite part of Legos is, hands down, the [Lego] community — just hanging out with all these people who love Legos,” he said. “It’s the golden age of nerds and a place for me to belong. It’s pretty awesome.” 
 
As seen in the May 8th issue of the Hippo.





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