The Hippo

HOME| ADVERTISING| CONTACT US|

 
Jan 22, 2018







NEWS & FEATURES

POLITICAL

FOOD & DRINK

ARTS

MUSIC & NIGHTLIFE

POP CULTURE



BEST OF
CLASSIFIEDS
ADVERTISING
CONTACT US
PAST ISSUES
ABOUT US
MOBILE UPDATES
LIST MY CALENDAR ITEM


Load and shoot
How to become an expert archer

04/02/15
By Ryan Lessard news@hippopress.com



With big-screen characters like Clint “Hawkeye” Barton and Katniss Everdeen donning bow and quiver and loosing countless arrows against their foes, it's no surprise young people are increasingly interested in learning how to become expert archers.

Dana White has been teaching archery in New Hampshire for about 50 years. At a Londonderry YMCA Advanced Archery class, which meets every Thursday evening, one of White's half-dozen students calls out “Go score!” and the archers leave the line to retrieve their arrows from the targets.
“I have adults and kids who both shoot here,” White said. “I don't keep the age group at just one level.”
White provides all the equipment for his classes, but his more advanced students prefer to bring their own bows. Targets vary in size from 40 to 80 centimeters.
“For little kids ... it's just basic drawback, anchor, aim and release,” White said. 
Advanced trainees get more into the technique.
“There's a lot of learning how to use your body properly. Breathing, your abs, back muscles, everything you need to coordinate in one motion,” said White.
Students can choose from three types of bows: recurve bows, compound bows and longbows. And there are two main techniques to shooting that archers can use based on their own preference. Target recurve shooting involves the use of a sight on your bow that guides your aim. When using this method, you must hold the arrow between your index and middle finger and pull your hand to rest (or anchor) under your jaw. When you release the bowstring, your hand must pull back. 
The other technique is called bare bow shooting. Bare bow shooters “nock” their arrows onto the bowstring above the hand and pull their hand back to the side of their face. This way, they can look down the shaft of the arrow to aim.
During White's class, after his students have scored their shots and collected their arrows, the designated leader calls out, “Shooters back!” and they all walk back to the line together. The leader then says, “Shooters to the line” to announce that the firing range is live. She waits until the other students signal their readiness by placing their pulling hands behind their backs. Then she initiates the next round: “Load and shoot!” 
 
As seen in the April 2, 2015 issue of the Hippo.





®2018 Hippo Press. site by wedu