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Making movies with iPhone or iPad

Where: Concord TV, 170 Warren St., Concord (in Concord High School)
When: Wednesday, Jan. 27, from 5:30 to 7 p.m.
Cost: $50
Contact: yourconcordtv.org, 226-8872




Making movies
How to do it with your phone or tablet

01/21/16
By Kelly Sennott ksennott@hippopress.com



 If  you’ve got a smartphone or tablet, you don’t need fancy gizmos and gadgets to put together a film.

This is the premise of Concord TV’s upcoming workshop Wednesday, Jan. 27, from 5:30 to 7 p.m., which tackles how to use these devices to make a movie, no professional video camera or computer required. 
“We did one-on-one [classes] on this for the longest time, but we found there was a need to expand it more into a workshop atmosphere,” said Chris Gentry, Concord TV programming/IT director, via phone. “Especially as more editing programs are coming out on the iPhone and iPad.”
Gentry speculated the demand comes from the popularity of photos and videos on social media and YouTube. Being adept at creating multimedia stories, he said, is also a strategic move professionally; he’s seen news reporters make and edit videos right on-site with their phones, but he suspects the skill would help in most job settings, nonprofits especially. 
“A lot of jobs have some sort of visual aspect, especially if it has any sort of social media or marketing involved,” Gentry said.“You don’t even have to have a computer [anymore]. … A lot of folks are going to their tablets or phones, and this gives them a way to step into it and use their voice to get stuff out there. And some of the cameras on the iPhones and iPads [are] shooting at much higher, much better resolution than some of the consumer-grade cameras out there.”
Plus, once you make a film, it’s not hard to get that material out.
“If you’re an individual or a nonprofit organization, a lot of these platforms you use — YouTube, Facebook, Vimeo — a lot of them are free to make an account,” said Shawn McHenry, Concord TV senior staff producer.
Gentry and McHenry said the workshop will cover a variety of topics, from camera style and photography to editing and whether (and how) to publish your films afterward. 
There’s a lot to be said for getting tips in person, but there are also a lot of things you can do on your own to heighten film quality.
One of the most important things to look at is your phone or tablet itself. Do you have the right apps? The pair are both fans of Adobe Photoshop Express, which helps you easily edit photos and adjust exposure, brightness, contrast and color. Gentry also likes Adobe Premiere Clip and iMovie for editing, while McHenry likes AndroVid for his Android phone. Then, look at space; the more you have, the more footage you can get, and thus, the more you can do.
It’s also helpful to know your way around copyright laws. Music is universally used to create emotion in multi-media storytelling, but it’s hard to do if you can’t afford to pay for copyrighted music. For this dilemma, they recommended GarageBand, a music creation studio whose interface makes it easy to learn, play, record and create music to go with your material. 
“I have a friend of mine who uses his phone to make snowboarding videos, and then he uses GarageBand to put music behind it,” Gentry said.
If you want to use material on other devices, they recommend using AirPlay or Photo Stream, which help transfer material. And if you want to increase the quality of your stuff, once you’ve mastered the basics, tiny attached microphones can increase sound quality, and clip-on lenses can help catch better, wider shots.
McHenry has used the skills to create weekly video diary entries to send to his parents while away, and Gentry has used the convenience to create vacation films.
“I’ve done a video in the past where I’ve shot stuff on my vacation, and then I have a 2- to 3-hour plane ride home. While I’m on the plane ride home, I’m editing, and when I get home, I can upload it to YouTube,” Gentry said. “You don’t have to shoot video, then go to upload it onto your computer to do the editing. You can basically do it in one spot.” 





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