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Nov 20, 2018







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Grown-up fun

For Halloween fun at area bars and restaurants, check out the Nite section of next week’s Hippo for a complete listing of events. If you have information on plans for a boo-bash, email music@hippopress.com.
 
All kinds of corn mazes
Beans & Greens Farm (245 Intervale Road, Gilford, 293-2853, beansandgreensfarm.com) has a daytime corn maze that includes scavenger hunts and family-friendly games, as well as a haunted nighttime corn maze on weekend nights. Both take about an hour to navigate. The daytime corn maze is open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and costs $7 per person ($5 for ages 12 and under). The nighttime corn maze is open on Friday and Saturday from 8 to 10 p.m. and costs $10 per person ($8 for ages 9 and under).
 
Beech Hill Farm & Ice Cream Barn (107 Beech Hill Road, Hopkinton, 223-0828, beechhillfarm.com/corn-mazes) has two corn mazes that are open to explore now through Oct. 31 from 11 a.m. to dusk, weather permitting. A brochure is provided with questions to answer and the answers hidden in the mazes. Each maze is approximately four acres in size and the answers to the questions take about 40 minutes to find. The cost to enter one or both of the mazes is $6 per person and free for ages 3 and under.
 
Coppal House Farm (118 N. River Road, Lee, 659-3972, nhcornmaze.com) has three corn mazes that each take about 35 to 45 minutes to navigate through. If you get lost, there are educational mailboxes and “corn crops” to help you find your way out. The cost to enter is $9 for adults, $7 for kids ages 5 to 12 and seniors 62 and older, as well as college students and military service members with an ID, and free for kids under 5. The mazes are open Monday through Friday from noon to 5 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. now through Nov. 5.
 
The Dark Crop (Lavoie’s Farm, 172 Nartoff Road, Hollis, 465-3275, thedarkcrop.com) is a nighttime corn maze featuring several costumed characters that interact with visitors as they navigate their way through. Everything is themed along the lines of a zombie-esque demented farmland, according to co-creator Chad Zingales, with costumes and roles designed by the characters themselves. The Dark Crop will be available on Friday, Oct. 20; Saturday, Oct. 21; Friday, Oct. 27, and Saturday, Oct. 28, with an opening time of 7:30 p.m. and the last ticket sold at 10 p.m. The cost is $14 for adults and $10 for kids 12 and under.
 
Elwood Orchards (54 Elwood Road, Londonderry, 434-6017, elwoodorchards.com) has a 14-acre corn maze that will be open daily from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. through the first week of November. The nighttime version of the maze is open every Friday and Saturday in October, from 6 to 10 p.m., with the last entrances at 9 p.m.
 
J&F Farms (124 Chester Road, Derry, 437-0535, jandffarms.com) has a free seasonal corn maze that is open from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. on weekdays except Wednesday, and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays.
 
Moulton Farm (18 Quarry Road, Meredith, 279-3915, moultonfarm.com/corn-maze) has a corn maze with stalks that can grow up to 15 feet tall. The cost to enter the maze is $7 per person, $5 for kids ages 3 to 6 and free for kids under 3. The maze opens at 8 a.m. each day and the last admission to the maze is one hour before the farm closes.
 
Trombly Gardens (150 N. River Road, Milford, 673-0647, tromblygardens.com) offers a daytime corn maze daily through Oct. 31. 
 




Maze craze
Explore a corn maze that’s challenging or creepy

10/19/17
By Matt Ingersoll listings@hippopress.com



 Nothing gets your blood pumping like getting yourself lost in a corn maze and trying to find your way out, and with several farms across southern New Hampshire offering either nighttime or daytime mazes for visitors of all ages, there is much to explore.

One Halloween-themed corn maze is The Dark Crop at Lavoie’s Farm in Hollis, now in its eighth year. Co-creator and Halloween enthusiast Chad Zingales said the idea behind it was to create an event focused on scary costumed characters with props that you encounter as you make your way through.
“There is an element that is inherently creepy about being outside in the middle of a field in pitch black darkness … that people really enjoy,” Zingales said. “Part of it also is getting the whole ambience of being outside in New Hampshire in the fall.”
Once you enter, you never know what kinds of characters you may encounter, according to Zingales.
“Our cast members come up with their own character designs, their own backstory for why they are in the cornfield, and they all even have their own way of talking,” he said. “It’s all based on stuff that you might see based along the lines of a creepy, demented zombie-esque farmland.”
The Dark Crop can be appropriate for all ages, according to Zingales, but the actors are trained in helping people get out of the maze, as well as interacting in different ways with different age groups of children and teens.
“Obviously we don’t want anybody to have nightmares. We want them to have a good time,” he said.
If you’d prefer to trek through a corn maze when you can see in front of you during the day, there are others in the state that focus more on the challenge of getting out rather than a dark and scary experience.
For Holly Kimball, creator of the corn mazes at Beech Hill Farm & Ice Cream Barn in Hopkinton, part of the fun is coming up with new themes every year to keep the two four-acre corn mazes at the farm fresh. This year’s themes are “Camo’s Canine Challenge” which focuses on dog breeds, and “Canada 150,” a maple-leaf-shaped corn maze in honor of Canada’s 150th anniversary.
“I think that corn mazes are right up there with apple-picking as becoming a part of a fall family tradition,” Kimball said.
But they don’t have to be enjoyed only by families. Corn mazes are also great for school groups, Scout troops and even couples, from high school age to older adults. Local church groups have frequented the mazes in the past as part of their own kind of alternative Halloween activity, according to Kimball.
“One of the things that makes our mazes popular with all ages is the brochure we provide with a scavenger-type activity for each theme,” she said. “There are signs that we have … hidden throughout the mazes for people to find … and each provides an answer to one of the questions on the maze brochure.” 





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