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Aug 15, 2018







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MILCK, This is Not the End (Atlantic Records)




Deadheads, This One Goes To 11 (High Roller Records)

If Stiv Bators sounded like Glenn Danzig, a Dead Boys reunion in the 1980s would have sounded like this, which is amazing for a couple of reasons. One, these street-punk, borderline metal meatheads have successfully bottled the essence of the New York Dolls and whatnot and are having a go at making this sorely missed attitude relevant again (the genre is called “action rock,” not that there’ll be a quiz later, but — oh, I won’t even bother mentioning obscure band names, you wouldn’t Google them anyway) and two, well, they’re from Sweden. OK, I hear the sound of a thousand pages being flipped to the Sudoku, but wait a second, this is a very worthy band. The throwback longhair in your home will thrill to the vague aura of Scorpions in (the unfortunately titled) “Black Out,” while your little brother who can’t deal with anything louder than The Darkness will gain enlightenment from Johnny Thunders joints like “Don’t Mind the Ghost.” Mind you, my favorite Ramones album was Animal Boy, so I have no problem with punk that’s a bit overproduced, but man does the world need more of this. A — Eric W. Saeger




MILCK, This is Not the End (Atlantic Records)
CD Reviews: February 2, 2018

02/01/18
By Eric Saeger news@hippopress.com



MILCK, This is Not the End (Atlantic Records)

In the war between the sexes, the modern women’s movement does have certain characteristics that can sometimes seem as intolerant as the manosphere’s bro-world misogyny, but that’s just the nature of boiled-over fury. The ladies are also developing a sound, or at least it’s been carpet-bombed upon them by this Los Angeles singer, who corralled/hired a few dozen women to sing her tune “Quiet” at the Women’s March on Washington on Jan. 21, 2017, after which it went viral. The song, a morosely mumbled ballad that a lot of people must have thought was Lorde, is on this seven-song EP, as is “Call of the Wild,” which borrows, well, just about everything from Imogen Heap’s “Hide and Seek,” up to and including the robo-effect-age on her voice. Then we have the pièce de résistance, a glassy eyed, stubbornly downtrodden version of “Ooh Child,” the 1970s-era Five Stairsteps hit that was best used in the 1991 movie Boyz n the Hood. If you want today’s women’s movement laid out in the form of a short record, this is it. B — Eric W. Saeger





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