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Strawberry and mascarpone crepes by Stefan Ryll.




Strawberry and Mascarpone Crepes

Recipe courtesy of Chef Stefan Ryll.
 
BATTER:
3 eggs
3/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons milk
3/4 cup all-purpose flour
5 teaspoons butter, melted
1 tablespoon sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/4 teaspoon salt
 
FILLING:
1 cup (8 ounces) mascarpone cheese
2 tablespoons confectioner’s sugar
1 teaspoon lemon juice
1-1/2 cups sliced fresh strawberries
 
STRAWBERRY TOPPING:
2 cups sliced fresh strawberries
1/2 cup sugar
2 tablespoons orange juice
1 teaspoon strawberry or vanilla extract
Dash salt
4 teaspoons butter, divided
 
In a blender, combine the batter ingredients; cover and process until smooth. Cover and refrigerate for 1 hour.
Meanwhile, for filling, in a small bowl, combine the cheese, confectioner’s sugar, and lemon juice. Gently fold in strawberries. Cover and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes.
For topping, in a small bowl, combine the strawberries, sugar, orange juice, extract and salt. Let stand for 30 minutes.
Melt 1 teaspoon butter in an 8-inch nonstick skillet over medium heat; pour about 1/4 cup batter into the center of skillet. Lift and tilt pan to coat bottom evenly. Cook until top appears dry; turn and cook 15 to 20 seconds longer. Remove to a wire rack. Repeat with remaining batter, greasing skillet as needed. When cool, stack crepes with waxed paper or paper towels in between.
Spoon filling over crepes; roll up. Serve with strawberry topping. Yield: 8 crepes.




Morning romance
Start Valentine’s Day with breakfast in bed

02/12/15
By Angie Sykeny asykeny@hippopress.com



Start rolling out the romance Valentine’s morning with breakfast in bed. 

“A breakfast in bed is old-fashioned and classic, but it will never go out of style,” said Stefan Ryll, assistant culinary professor at Southern New Hampshire University. “It’s very appropriate for Valentine’s Day or any day you want to tell someone you love and appreciate them.”
Plan everything ahead of time so the morning runs smoothly. First, decide on a recipe. Do you want to make your partner’s favorite breakfast, or do you want to make something new? Be honest with yourself about your cooking abilities and pick something that is feasible to make at home. 
“There are a lot of very simple breakfast ideas you can do with fancy varieties,” said Ryll. 
If you want to make something on the sweeter side, Ryll suggests getting creative with French toast by stuffing it with caramel, strawberry cheesecake or orange pecan. You can also make a crepe, a thin pancake filled with fruit or chocolate. Try one filled with strawberries and mascarpone cheese, or one with chocolate with raspberry sauce drizzled over top.
Looking for something less sweet? Think about eggs Benedict with smoked salmon or lemon. You could also try an omelet, frittata or quiche. Croissants are another option and can be filled with almost anything from cheese and meat to fruit or chocolate. 
If you feel like these are beyond your cooking abilities, don’t worry. There are still things you can do to give your breakfast pizazz. 
“Heart-shaped anything is great for Valentine’s Day,” said Darlene Johnston, innkeeper of the Ash Street Inn, a bed and breakfast in Manchester. “You can do heart-shaped pancakes, French toast, scones or muffins.You can also try mimosa instead of plain orange juice, or add some chocolate-covered strawberries on the side.” 
If it’s a dish you’ve never made before, try making a test batch while your partner is out. You don’t want to wake your partner Valentine’s Day morning with the smell of burnt food or the sound of you scrambling around the kitchen in a panic. When buying the ingredients for your recipe, be sure to get fresh and quality food. Nothing ruins the romance like moldy strawberries.
Once you’ve decided on the food, start planning the presentation. Make sure you have a nice tray with edges on the sides to keep everything in place. Use your best china and silverware instead of plastic and a nice linen instead of paper napkin. Also consider laying an extra table cloth over the bed to catch any crumbs.
Garnish the tray with chocolate, candy or fruit. Ryll recommends a strawberry rose. To make a strawberry rose, simply cut a thin slice of the berry toward the stem without cutting all the way through. Gently bend the slice back and repeat the whole way around the berry. Then, continue working inward in layers so that the slices look like rose petals. 
If you want to go the extra mile, think about adding flowers, gifts or a card to the breakfast.
“You can put flowers in a small vase or a single rose laid down on the tray,” Ryll said. “A love note, poem or handmade card is a very good idea, especially on Valentine’s Day. A small gift is also nice to include. It doesn’t have to be elaborate, but it’s the time and thought put into it.” 
When the breakfast is over, make sure you clean up so your partner doesn’t have to worry about a messy kitchen or a pile of dirty dishes. 
“Breakfast in bed is a wonderful way of showing someone they are special,” Ryll said. “Remember to cater the breakfast in bed to his or her special interests and appetites, and most importantly, serve it with love.” 
 
As seen in the February 12, 2015 issue of the Hippo.





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