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Nov 17, 2018







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Derek Brown, Beatbox Sax (self-released)




Derek Brown, Beatbox Sax (self-released)

Proper release of the album that’s already become this Chicago-based journeyman’s brand on a YouTube channel and other venues. Just as it looks, this is actually a technique, a blend of beatboxing and using the sax as a found instrument, which in this case means Brown might tap it, double-tongue it or even attach an egg shaker to the bell. No, this isn’t exactly a Blue Man Group thing, and neither is it a Mingus-wannabe skronk-fest of pointless noise; these are mostly cover versions of familiar pop trinkets such as “Every Breath You Take” and “What is Love” with special attention paid to the original melodies and percussion, though not quite to the extent that it becomes a novelty record. Brown does some decent-enough traditional beatboxing on “Blueberry Jam,” one of four originals on hand here, and shows off some admirable horn chops, for example the extended arpeggios of Herbie Hancock’s “Chameleon” and a pretty freaking brilliant rub of Bach’s Cello Suite No. 1, which you’ll recognize from many pop-cultural appearances, the movie Master and Commander for one. A — Eric W. Saeger




Negura Bunget, Zi (Prophecy Productions)
CD Reviews: November 10, 2016

11/10/16
By Eric Saeger news@hippopress.com



Negura Bunget, Zi (Prophecy Productions)

I can understand why black metal fans are ticked off about Deafheaven — hipsters love them for some reason, that’s why. It’s actually a thing nowadays, “hipster black metal,” and it’s somehow seen to include Myrkur, which ventures off into snap-dance territory (man, do the die-hard Beelzebub-rockers hate that girl!). Nugura Bunget, however, is the real deal, in every way — they’re even from Transylvania (OK, Romania, but if you ordered the special edition of their 2010 album Vîrstele Pămîntului, it came in a burnt box that also held genuine Transylvanian soil), which gives them a ton of style points. Why, all these guys have to do for videography is walk outside and shoot film of their spooky forests, which sums up the 10-minute film they tabled for this new one, their seventh. Like Deafheaven, this stuff is part ambient Sunn(((O))) and part extreme/math, with a lot of tortured but shiny riffing, all topped off with vocals that sound like a giant angry Viking who wants to throw you in a skillet. Stupid in some ways, magnificent in others. B





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