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Nov 17, 2018







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A view of the porch and front lawn at Schoodacs in Warner. Allie Ginwala photo.




Schoodacs Coffee House

Where: 1 E. Main St., Warner
Call: 456-3400
Visit: facebook.com/Schoodacs
Opened Friday, Sept. 11. Grand opening and ribbon-cutting Wednesday, Sept. 30. Hours daily from 6 a.m. to about 4 p.m.




New to the neighborhood
Warner coffee house focuses on community

09/17/15
By Allie Ginwala aginwala@hippopress.com



After spending a dozen summers in New Hampshire visiting family, Darryl and Kristin Parker decided to make it their home — and the home of Schoodacs Coffee House, which opened Sept. 11.

They bought the building on East Main Street in Warner last year, with the intention of using it as a place to work on their business, Parker Web, but they soon realized the potential of the space that’s near The Local, The Foothills and MainStreet BookEnds downtown.
“There were pieces that were here, but it seemed like there was a gap, and we felt like the coffee shop helped really fill that gap,” Darryl Parker said. 
 
Reviving a community corner
A number of coffee shops have occupied space downtown over the years, including White Mountain Coffee and Clovis Moon, but none for the past two years or so, Parker said. 
Schoodacs manager Mark Allen, who’s lived in Warner for 13 years, said the property that now houses Schoodacs used to be a quiet and overgrown corner.
“I remember speaking to some locals and them saying ‘that corner’s always been dead,’” Parker added. “The goal was definitely to revitalize this property.”
One of the ways he did that was by building a 400-square-foot porch onto the building, a drastic change that local residents quickly picked up on. 
“I’ve had people come up to me and say, ‘Did you move the building closer to the street?’ Because it made such a dramatic visual difference,” Parker said.
Parker hopes both the porch and the now more open grassy space between the porch and the road will become gathering places. 
 
The local vibe
The Parkers’ goal for the coffee house is to make it as local as possible, including its uniquely Warner name.
“It is very much part of the local vocabulary,” Parker said. “If you live in Warner you know the name Schoodac.”
He listed the places where “Schoodac” appears, like the name of a road just south of town and the brook that runs beside it. According to the historical society, the word is onomatopoeia for the sound the sawmill made as the wood was processed through the lumber mill. A large saw blade, gifted by a resident who found it in his backyard,  is on a wall in the center of the room.
 
Behind the counter
Schoodacs developed its own blends with a coffee roaster based in North Carolina. Their dark roast is Italian, breaking from the norm of typically French dark roasts.
“The Italian roast has an almost smoky … [flavor],” Parker said. “And then our medium uses a little bit of a Sumatran bean in it with some of the brighter Central American beans mixed in with it as well.”
Schoodacs has a selection of 30 loose-leaf teas from green and oolong to herbal and pu’er. Parker said customers who drink the tea in-house will be served a clear infuser so they can watch it brew at the table.
The display case at the counter will be filled with pastries like chocolate and almond croissants, scones, muffins and more, from Tarte Cafe and Bakery in Andover.
“We talked to several different bakers in the area and ... the thing that we really liked about her is she’s a small business and that she bakes to order, basically,” Parker said of owner and pastry chef Corinne Cline. “And she is a classically trained French baker.”
In the mornings, Schoodacs has a hot steel-cut oatmeal bar. 
“This is not a pre-packaged oatmeal,” Parker said. “We serve it from our soup basins and we’ll have a toppings bar for that oatmeal.” 
Other breakfast items include fresh-cut fruit and yogurt and granola parfaits. For lunch, they’ll do one or two daily soups. They also have containers of old-fashioned dime candy next to the counter.
“We’re going to introduce things as the locals let us know what they like and what they want,” he said. 





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