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Sep 23, 2018







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Ohmslice, Conduit (Imaginator Records)




Miguel, War & Leisure (RCA Records)

It may look a bit staid to note that this R&B crooner’s an RCA product, but that’s only because Jive Records went the way of the Prince cassette a few years ago; that’s where Miguel was before, shimmying and electro-fritzing his way toward the figure he cuts now, a tacit successor to Prince, or, more to the point, Babyface. The latest Hot Guy With the Right Dreads, this mononymed L.A. star’s bubblegum appeal has been sharpened for this release, or maybe that’d be fuzzed up, with mountainous reverb making his sweet voice and his guitarist’s glow even more than it had previously. Rick Ross and sloppy, big-ass Death Grips-style drums help opening track “Criminal” announce that this kid isn’t just a boy-toy, but then we’re on to the real business with initial single “Sky Walker,” a faultless, harmless 1980s-tinged confection about partying at mansions. Pandering, yes, but he also pays tribute to his artistic path-beater Prince in the effect’s riddled “Pineapple Skies.”
— Eric W. Saeger




Ohmslice, Conduit (Imaginator Records)
CD Reviews: December 28, 2017

12/28/17
By Eric Saeger news@hippopress.com



Ohmslice, Conduit (Imaginator Records)

Fine, then, let’s get weird. Forewarned that this band was from New York and included a Blue Man Group drummer and Swans guitarist Bill Bronson, I knew this thing was going to be trippy, but I honestly didn’t expect it to be better than anything I’ve heard from Jarboe, not that I’m a completist of her work, and no, she’s not on here. The primal rhythms from the Blue Man guy are what draws in the listener; the honking, abstract, Mingus-informed sax of Yo La Tengo’s Daniel Carter keep your brain at arm’s length; Bronson’s grungy-muddy lines add eeriness, and then there’s singer Jane LeCroy, who, when she’s not mumbling gestalt about “are you getting madder?” offers a sourball-mouthed soprano that could pass for Leslie Feist. As with anything of this sort, I’m not huge on the skronky beatnik stream-of-consciousness presented, but the slapdash post-fusion of the overall sound can be irresistible. A-  — Eric W. Saeger





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