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The tap dancers in the Palace’s Silver Stars troupe. Kelly Sennott photo.




Palace Silver Stars Present Best of 100 Years at the Palace

Where: Palace Theatre, 80 Hanover St., Manchester
 
When: Friday, Sept. 5, at 7 p.m., and Saturday, Sept. 6, at 1 p.m.
 
Admission: $10
 
Contact: 668-5588, palacetheatre.org

 





Palace past
Silver Stars celebrate theater’s history

08/28/14
By Kelly Sennott ksennott@hippopress.com



It seems fitting that the Palace Theatre is celebrating its 100 years in existence with a show from the Silver Stars, a group of performers ages 55 and older who might have a little more insight into some of the musical acts they’ll be performing from the Palace’s earlier days.
 
The Palace Silver Stars present Best of 100 Years at the Palace on Friday, Sept. 5, at 7 p.m., and Saturday, Sept. 6, at 1 p.m., at the theater. The show will be of vaudevillian flavor, with numbers that not only span performance media — tap, swing dance, vocals, guitar, piano — but also the Palace’s history, starting with its early days and moving through the 21st century. 
 
A small taste of the music they’ll perform: “Cheek to Cheek” from Top Hat and “Adelaide’s Lament” from Guys and Dolls; “Lullabye of Broadway” from 42nd Street and “Too Darn Hot” from Kiss Me Kate; “Be Our Guest” from Beauty and the Beast and “Look on the Bright Side of Life” from Spamalot. They’ll wear a variety of costumes throughout the evening, some of them covered in sparkles. All of the songs come from past Palace Theatre productions.
 
There are about 25 performers in the cast, six of whom will be tap dancing to songs like “Cheek to Cheek,” which is what many were rehearsing for during interviews. 
 
“None of them are professional,” said Cathy McKay, the show’s choreographer. “This group just really wants to be involved. … Some of us have tap dancing background. Some of us don’t.”
 
Lorraine Page does. She’s been involved with theater for 20 years and has been performing with Silver Stars the past seven. 
 
“I’ve been dancing all my life,” Page said. “I’m a happy girl. … I’m 77, but age is just a number to me. It’s up here [she gestured to her head] and in here [she pointed to her heart]. … But I love being on the stage. When I get out there, I go absolutely nutso. I get starstruck.”
 
While she had a history of dancing, she only took one year of tap lessons before joining the tap group with the Silver Stars, which is comprised of six dancers. It didn’t take her long to become acclimated. 
 
“I just jumped into doing it. It might be hard for other people, but it wasn’t hard for me. It was fairly easy, because I’ve got the rhythm in me!” Page said, while she laughed and demonstrated the New Yorker, a tap dance move, at a recent rehearsal. Her favorite song of the evening is “Someone to Watch Over Me.”
 
Marie Klinedinst, 65, has been performing with the Silver Stars for about 10 years. She became more involved with the Palace when she retired from Public Service and was free for daytime rehearsals. She currently works part-time at the Palace, at the box office and in the administration offices, and has performed with the theater’s A Christmas Carol and Guys and Dolls productions, in addition to local community theater companies.
 
“It’s a fun atmosphere. There’s a social element as well,” Klinedinst said. “This is my niche. Working in theater for me is heaven. I am 65, and trying not to get old. I think that lots of times, when you retire and have no extra activities or extra interests, you end up getting stagnant and getting old. Keeping moving is the
key.”
 
People will like the show, she said, simply because the performers are seniors.
 
“People aren’t used to seeing seniors onstage. They realize there is something seniors can participate in. We’re not playing cards at a senior center. Some of us are in our 60s and can still tap dance! I think people enjoy that,” Klinedinst said. 
 





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