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New England Vintage Electronics Expo

Where: Courtyard Marriott, 2200 Southwood Drive, Nashua 
When: Sunday, March 4, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. 
Cost: Admission is $10 per person or family between 8 and 11 a.m., free for all after 11 a.m. 
More info: nearc.net, 772-7516




Radios and more
Vintage electronics expo comes to Nashua

03/01/18
By Angie Sykeny asykeny@hippopress.com



 For years, the New England Antique Radio Club has hosted an annual antique radio show, but this year’s show, newly named the New England Vintage Electronics Expo, will have a lot more than just radios. It takes place Sunday, March 4, at the Courtyard Marriott in Nashua, and will feature more than 100 tables and 60 vendors selling a wide variety of vintage electronic items.  

“Ninety percent of the people in our club are over [age] 60, which is why we’ve decided to migrate from antique radios to all kinds of vintage electronics,” club president Bruce Phillips said. “Vinyl records and early computers and games ring a bell more with the younger crowd. People under [age] 40 can relate to that better than they can to a tube radio.” 
The show is the largest of its kind in New England and attracts vendors and attendees from all over New England, New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Canada. 
Items for sale will include tube and transistor radios, tube audio gear, record players, vinyl records, stereo receivers, speakers, telephones, televisions, early computers and calculators, parts and ephemera, amateur radio and communication devices, vacuum tubes, telegraphs and gaming gear. All items are 25 years old or older, most ranging from the 1930s to the 1980s, but some dating back as far as the 1890s. Additionally, raffle prizes like novelty tube radios and 8-track players will be awarded every hour. 
“It runs the gamut,” Phillips said. “We’ve had radios that have sold in the $3,000 to $4,000 range, and we’ve had other stuff that has sold for as little as $2 or $3, so you never know what will be there.” 
People seek out vintage electronics for a number of reasons, Phillips said; some people intend to use them for their original purposes while others buy them simply as collection items. Then, there are those who are interested in the technical aspects of the electronics, while others focus on the aesthetic qualities. 
“By virtue of all vintage things other than automobiles, radios have the best design variety of anything ever made,” Phillips said. “The term ‘eye candy’ comes up a lot. There may be a radio with Mickey Mouse on it, or one that looks like the dashboard of a 1960s car, or one with a beautiful color blue. They’re so much more unique and interesting than just a box with a tuning knob.” 
The event serves not only as a place to purchase vintage electronics, but also as a place to learn about them. Many people attend just to browse, take pictures and ask the vendors questions. 
“We love it when a family comes in and shows their young child an old telephone with a rotary dial, and the kid is like, ‘Huh? What is this?’” Phillips said. “It’s a wonderful learning opportunity for younger people … and [older people] like to think back to their younger days. It brings back a lot of memories.” 





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