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Anne of Green Gables. Courtesy photo.




Edible book contest

Where: Nashua Public Library, 2 Court St., Nashua
When: Sunday, April 19, from 1:30 to 4 p.m.
See: nashuapubliclibrary.org. Optional registration at tinyurl.com/nplediblebook. 




Read a book, and eat it too
Contest in Nashua joins books and food

04/16/15
By Allie Ginwala aginwala@hippopress.com



Since you shouldn’t judge a book by its cover, judge it instead by the foods used to make it. For the third year, the Nashua Public Library invites those inspired by literature and food to get creative and join in or just stop by to see the Edible Book Contest on Sunday, April 19. 

“Everything has to be edible and somehow relate to a book or literature,” Carol Eyman, outreach and community services coordinator for Nashua Public Library, said in a phone interview. “[It] can look like or be inspired by … a character or be based on the text.”
The brainchild of a library staff member and her daughter, the idea for the contest is to “bring talents from many disciplines like cooking and art and literature altogether,” Eyman said. 
Entries are broken into categories for children, adults and families and the winners are chosen by library visitors who stop by on the day of the competition and vote. Rules for the contest are straightforward: each entry must relate to literature in some way and be made entirely of edible materials.
“Edible” doesn’t mean that the finished creation must be ready to consume, just that all of the pieces that went into it could be eaten. 
“It might be disgusting to eat it, but as long as you could eat it,” Eyman said. 
For example, one of last year’s entries was based on Moby Dick and featured blue jello in a Pyrex dish with the ship the Pequod made of peapods, green beans and uncooked spaghetti.
“It’s amazing the effort people put in,” Eyman said.
Cedi Rousseau of Hudson and her daughter won the family category last year with their creation based on Through the Looking Glass by Lewis Carroll. Rousseau decided to join because of her love of literature.
“I love books. I love reading,” she said in a phone interview. “More kids need to read; they’re too into video games. I thought it was a nice thing to do with my daughter.”
Since  Through the Looking Glass is one of her daughter’s favorite books, Rousseau said, they made the wacky representation of Alice’s adventures using cake decorating materials like fondant gum paste, sugar sheet and sugar paint. After a week of assembling little roses and a large Cheshire cat smile, Rousseau and her daughter were finished. 
“We did a little bit every day,” she said.
Both Rousseau and her daughter will be competing again, but this year in separate categories, Rousseau said. 
“[It’s] so neat and draws attention [to books] and if [the kids] like it, they may really want to read the book,” she said.
Prizes are awarded to winners in each category, usually in the form of gift certificates to local restaurants and businesses. All entries are due at the library on Sunday, April 19, between 1 and 1:30 p.m. Visitors can view and vote on their favorites from 1:30 to 4 p.m. while enjoying a piece of non-literature-based cake. 
 
As seen in the April 16, 2015 issue of the Hippo.





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